Blackburn patient sent home by taxi in his pyjamas

Blackburn Citizen: Neil McGregor was given pyjamas and asked to make his way to the taxi collection area outside the hospital entrance Neil McGregor was given pyjamas and asked to make his way to the taxi collection area outside the hospital entrance

A DISABLED man has hit out at the Royal Blackburn Hospital after he was sent home in a taxi wearing only pyjamas.

Neil McGregor, 50, suffered an epileptic fit in bed at his sheltered accommodation in Crosby Road, Blackburn, but managed to press an alert button.

He said he was unable to take anything with him to hospital after passing out before paramedics could arrive.

He was changed into a dressing gown on arrival at the A&E department last Sunday, and was discharged from the medical assessment unit just before 1pm on Monday after undergoing tests.

He said he was given pyjamas, and then asked to make his way to the taxi collection area outside the hospital’s main entrance.

He was unable to contact any friends, or family, for help as their contact numbers were at his house.

Mr McGregor, a father-of-one, said: “I couldn’t believe that I was expected to wait for a taxi in reception, wearing just pyjamas.

“I asked a nurse if she could sort it out for the taxi to come to the ambulance drop-off at A&E, which is a bit more private, which she did.

“Then when I got home, I had to go into the house to get my money out. I asked the taxi driver to come to the house with me, so I wouldn’t have to go outside again in the pyjamas in front of all of the street in the middle of the day.

“Whenever anything like this has happened before, I’ve always been able to get patient transport home, which has been a lot more dignified. It’s bad enough this has happened to me, but I’d hate to think that a woman was put in that position.”

Lynn Wissett, deputy chief exe-cutive of East Lancashire Hosp-itals NHS Trust, said: “Hospital transport is only provided for those patients whose mobility, or medical condition, makes it diff-icult, or impossible, for them to use private, or public, transport.

“A patient’s eligibility for pat-ient transport is determined by a healthcare professional using a set of criteria provided by the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust.

“Those who do not have a gen-uine need for non-emergency patient transport are advised on what other means are available to them, such as public transport.

“The Trust aims to ensure the privacy and dignity of all our patients.

“In circumstances where pat-ients are admitted to A&E with-out personal belongings and subsequently discharged, staff make every effort to maintain patient dignity through use of gowns, pyjamas and blankets.”

Comments (24)

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7:13pm Mon 1 Oct 12

alphadelta says...

The NHS Trust has got this absolutely right - follow the set-out procedures, and never, ever, use any common sense...
The NHS Trust has got this absolutely right - follow the set-out procedures, and never, ever, use any common sense... alphadelta

7:18pm Mon 1 Oct 12

2 for 5p says...

Quote.

Lynn Wissett, deputy chief exe-cutive of East Lancashire Hosp-itals NHS Trust, said: “Hospital transport is only provided for those patients whose mobility, or medical condition, makes it diff-icult, or impossible, for them to use private, or public, transport.

There it is in black and white rules are rules.
Quote. Lynn Wissett, deputy chief exe-cutive of East Lancashire Hosp-itals NHS Trust, said: “Hospital transport is only provided for those patients whose mobility, or medical condition, makes it diff-icult, or impossible, for them to use private, or public, transport. There it is in black and white rules are rules. 2 for 5p

7:42pm Mon 1 Oct 12

wrigglers says...

I cant see what his problem is. Did they make sure he was fit and well? yes they did. What did he expect them to do. go to his house and collect clothes for him? Sorry but if I had been admitted to hospital and they made sure I was good to go and I couldnt contact family or friends id be more than happy to get out of the place with just pjs on.
I cant see what his problem is. Did they make sure he was fit and well? yes they did. What did he expect them to do. go to his house and collect clothes for him? Sorry but if I had been admitted to hospital and they made sure I was good to go and I couldnt contact family or friends id be more than happy to get out of the place with just pjs on. wrigglers

7:43pm Mon 1 Oct 12

jimpy0 says...

Single vulnerable patients are aware of the Green Cross scheme whereby an unobtrusive green cross sign is placed in a highly visible place which means there is a plastic canister in your fridge for the benefit of ambulance and hospital staff which contains ALL your medication and contact details --- so serves the numpty right!
Single vulnerable patients are aware of the Green Cross scheme whereby an unobtrusive green cross sign is placed in a highly visible place which means there is a plastic canister in your fridge for the benefit of ambulance and hospital staff which contains ALL your medication and contact details --- so serves the numpty right! jimpy0

7:45pm Mon 1 Oct 12

wrigglers says...

One other point, you could not be that bothered about dignity if you dressed in pjs and stood in the street to have your pic taken for readers of the local rag to see.
One other point, you could not be that bothered about dignity if you dressed in pjs and stood in the street to have your pic taken for readers of the local rag to see. wrigglers

7:58pm Mon 1 Oct 12

sagems says...

boozes from 9am in town centre pubs say no more
boozes from 9am in town centre pubs say no more sagems

8:06pm Mon 1 Oct 12

isitrightthat says...

Could he not have given contact numbers for family to the nurses ? Surely he could recall at least one number in his memory.
Did he want the hospital to kit him out ? Or as mentioned earlier someone to go to his house ? Certainly not a nurses job to do that .
If he got an ambulance he would have been part of a multi drop off service so a taxi was a good option.
Hell people go to the shops in pyjamas and dressing gowns nowadays .
Could he not have given contact numbers for family to the nurses ? Surely he could recall at least one number in his memory. Did he want the hospital to kit him out ? Or as mentioned earlier someone to go to his house ? Certainly not a nurses job to do that . If he got an ambulance he would have been part of a multi drop off service so a taxi was a good option. Hell people go to the shops in pyjamas and dressing gowns nowadays . isitrightthat

9:57pm Mon 1 Oct 12

accy lad and proud says...

Don't think he'd look out of place in P.J'S in Blackburn ! Is it not standard dress these days ?
Don't think he'd look out of place in P.J'S in Blackburn ! Is it not standard dress these days ? accy lad and proud

10:02pm Mon 1 Oct 12

dougsie says...

whats the numpty stilled dressed in his pjs for days after he got home.get a life you town dosser
whats the numpty stilled dressed in his pjs for days after he got home.get a life you town dosser dougsie

10:03pm Mon 1 Oct 12

jellybiff says...

what a i can't understand is why all of the hyphens in the words ???pat-ient are the LET real.
what a i can't understand is why all of the hyphens in the words ???pat-ient are the LET real. jellybiff

10:05pm Mon 1 Oct 12

M.DANNY says...

I have seen blokes and women in pyjamas and night gowns in my local shops doing their shopping at early in morning and late at night..Surely this guy could have remembered one of his relative phone number.We cant send an Ambulance for patient who are capable of travelling in a taxi or private cars .Ambulance are and should be for emergencies only.Most Ambulance are used as muti drop off service for those patient whose mobility or medical condition make it difficult or impossible them to use private or public transport.
I have seen blokes and women in pyjamas and night gowns in my local shops doing their shopping at early in morning and late at night..Surely this guy could have remembered one of his relative phone number.We cant send an Ambulance for patient who are capable of travelling in a taxi or private cars .Ambulance are and should be for emergencies only.Most Ambulance are used as muti drop off service for those patient whose mobility or medical condition make it difficult or impossible them to use private or public transport. M.DANNY

10:16pm Mon 1 Oct 12

davemcb says...

Ah, yes, "the NHS is the jewel in the crown" ..... (and other assorted cobblers)
Ah, yes, "the NHS is the jewel in the crown" ..... (and other assorted cobblers) davemcb

10:27pm Mon 1 Oct 12

powerpop says...

Next headline will read:
Blackburn patient made to stand in street in his pyjamas for photo shoot.
Next headline will read: Blackburn patient made to stand in street in his pyjamas for photo shoot. powerpop

10:28pm Mon 1 Oct 12

Rimbus says...

accy lad and proud wrote:
Don't think he'd look out of place in P.J'S in Blackburn ! Is it not standard dress these days ?
It's not just Blackburn pal. I drive through Ribbleton (suburb of Preston) each day on my way to work and regularly see young girls who must have pupped within weeks of reaching puberty pushing prams (usually with a can of Stella in the cup-holder) whilst accompanying their brood to school. The attire of choice is Primani checked PJ's with a pair of fake Ugg boots and a hoodie of some description. I can only assume that it save's time when they get back home when they can get straight back in the sack without missing any of the day's cultural offerings on the Jeremy Kyle show.
[quote][p][bold]accy lad and proud[/bold] wrote: Don't think he'd look out of place in P.J'S in Blackburn ! Is it not standard dress these days ?[/p][/quote]It's not just Blackburn pal. I drive through Ribbleton (suburb of Preston) each day on my way to work and regularly see young girls who must have pupped within weeks of reaching puberty pushing prams (usually with a can of Stella in the cup-holder) whilst accompanying their brood to school. The attire of choice is Primani checked PJ's with a pair of fake Ugg boots and a hoodie of some description. I can only assume that it save's time when they get back home when they can get straight back in the sack without missing any of the day's cultural offerings on the Jeremy Kyle show. Rimbus

10:58pm Mon 1 Oct 12

thequietone says...

"sent home by taxi in his pyjamas." Strange place to keep a taxi,must have jolly big pyjamas.
"sent home by taxi in his pyjamas." Strange place to keep a taxi,must have jolly big pyjamas. thequietone

11:00pm Mon 1 Oct 12

HarryBosch says...

After working all of my life from the age of 16 I underwent life changing health issues a couple of years ago. My experience has taught me that you have to plan for EVERY eventuality. Being vulnerable is not nice and embarrassment can be avoided by forward planning. Use the green cross scheme and keep a "go bag" ready with EVERYTHING you might need for a hospital stay.Include in it some for taxis etc. Life changing illnesses mean just that! Including changing your thinking. Take it as a lesson fella. And, sadly, as some commenters have said, it seems that nipping to the corner shop in PJ's or dressing gown as come to be widely accepted practice. I wouldn't believe it had I not seen it with my own eyes!!
After working all of my life from the age of 16 I underwent life changing health issues a couple of years ago. My experience has taught me that you have to plan for EVERY eventuality. Being vulnerable is not nice and embarrassment can be avoided by forward planning. Use the green cross scheme and keep a "go bag" ready with EVERYTHING you might need for a hospital stay.Include in it some for taxis etc. Life changing illnesses mean just that! Including changing your thinking. Take it as a lesson fella. And, sadly, as some commenters have said, it seems that nipping to the corner shop in PJ's or dressing gown as come to be widely accepted practice. I wouldn't believe it had I not seen it with my own eyes!! HarryBosch

11:03pm Mon 1 Oct 12

HarryBosch says...

should read - include in it some money for taxis etc.
should read - include in it some money for taxis etc. HarryBosch

11:21pm Mon 1 Oct 12

burner says...

. . . " a taxi in pyjamas" . . . OMG the state of taxis round here nowadays !!! doesn't even a taxi bother to get dressed properly ?
. . . " a taxi in pyjamas" . . . OMG the state of taxis round here nowadays !!! doesn't even a taxi bother to get dressed properly ? burner

8:21am Tue 2 Oct 12

A Darener says...

Wow! What a sympathetic lot you are! Heaven help you all if you are ever in a similar situation. Have a bit of compassion!
Wow! What a sympathetic lot you are! Heaven help you all if you are ever in a similar situation. Have a bit of compassion! A Darener

8:48am Tue 2 Oct 12

ghanto says...

THIS GUY IS FIT ENOUGH TO COME INTO PAPERS AND TAKE SUCH ACTION I PRESUME HE WAS FIT ENOUGH TO OUT THROUSERS ON HIMSELF

GIVE HIM COMPENSATION AND HE WILL BE O.K
THIS GUY IS FIT ENOUGH TO COME INTO PAPERS AND TAKE SUCH ACTION I PRESUME HE WAS FIT ENOUGH TO OUT THROUSERS ON HIMSELF GIVE HIM COMPENSATION AND HE WILL BE O.K ghanto

9:00am Tue 2 Oct 12

mavrick says...

The selfish attitudes shown on here typify the judgemental me first society. The whole of the welfare system in this country is slowly being dismantled.This story is just the tip of the iceberg. It seems the Royal Blackburn is always in the news for the wrong reasons. I think it is time Lynn Wisset considered her position along with several other senior managers. It would seem the hospital stumbles from crisis to crisis, The welfare system in this country is worth fighting for, despite the small minded bigotry regarding people on benefits. I hope those who are lucky enough to have a well paid job realise that not everyone on benefits is a lead swinging dosser. there by the grace of the accountants go you.
The selfish attitudes shown on here typify the judgemental me first society. The whole of the welfare system in this country is slowly being dismantled.This story is just the tip of the iceberg. It seems the Royal Blackburn is always in the news for the wrong reasons. I think it is time Lynn Wisset considered her position along with several other senior managers. It would seem the hospital stumbles from crisis to crisis, The welfare system in this country is worth fighting for, despite the small minded bigotry regarding people on benefits. I hope those who are lucky enough to have a well paid job realise that not everyone on benefits is a lead swinging dosser. there by the grace of the accountants go you. mavrick

9:12am Tue 2 Oct 12

ghanto says...

HIS GUY IS FIT ENOUGH TO COME INTO PAPERS AND TAKE SUCH ACTION I PRESUME HE WAS FIT ENOUGH TO OUT THROUSERS ON HIMSELF

GIVE HIM COMPENSATION AND HE WILL BE O.K
HIS GUY IS FIT ENOUGH TO COME INTO PAPERS AND TAKE SUCH ACTION I PRESUME HE WAS FIT ENOUGH TO OUT THROUSERS ON HIMSELF GIVE HIM COMPENSATION AND HE WILL BE O.K ghanto

1:24pm Tue 2 Oct 12

ladysal says...

mavrick wrote:
The selfish attitudes shown on here typify the judgemental me first society. The whole of the welfare system in this country is slowly being dismantled.This story is just the tip of the iceberg. It seems the Royal Blackburn is always in the news for the wrong reasons. I think it is time Lynn Wisset considered her position along with several other senior managers. It would seem the hospital stumbles from crisis to crisis, The welfare system in this country is worth fighting for, despite the small minded bigotry regarding people on benefits. I hope those who are lucky enough to have a well paid job realise that not everyone on benefits is a lead swinging dosser. there by the grace of the accountants go you.
Not entirely sure what you are trying to say.
No one on these comments has said anything about benefits.
Whilst I am aware that the Royal Balckburn and the NHS in general do have issues which need to be resolved, I'm with the vast majority who are having difficulty working out what he has to complain about.
Yes, he had to come home in his pyjamas. So? Are you / him seriously saying that the NHS should provide him with day clothes?
Patient transport has always been meant ONLY for people who are not able to travel on public transport / in car belonging to a relative. Why is he entitled to something different?
Others have said that there is a system for vulnerable people to ensure that medication / cash / clothes are taken to hospital with them by paramedics if required: why isn't he using it?
If he had been thrown out with no transport at 3am on a night where temperatures were several degrees below zero, then yes he may have a point, but he wasn't was he?
[quote][p][bold]mavrick[/bold] wrote: The selfish attitudes shown on here typify the judgemental me first society. The whole of the welfare system in this country is slowly being dismantled.This story is just the tip of the iceberg. It seems the Royal Blackburn is always in the news for the wrong reasons. I think it is time Lynn Wisset considered her position along with several other senior managers. It would seem the hospital stumbles from crisis to crisis, The welfare system in this country is worth fighting for, despite the small minded bigotry regarding people on benefits. I hope those who are lucky enough to have a well paid job realise that not everyone on benefits is a lead swinging dosser. there by the grace of the accountants go you.[/p][/quote]Not entirely sure what you are trying to say. No one on these comments has said anything about benefits. Whilst I am aware that the Royal Balckburn and the NHS in general do have issues which need to be resolved, I'm with the vast majority who are having difficulty working out what he has to complain about. Yes, he had to come home in his pyjamas. So? Are you / him seriously saying that the NHS should provide him with day clothes? Patient transport has always been meant ONLY for people who are not able to travel on public transport / in car belonging to a relative. Why is he entitled to something different? Others have said that there is a system for vulnerable people to ensure that medication / cash / clothes are taken to hospital with them by paramedics if required: why isn't he using it? If he had been thrown out with no transport at 3am on a night where temperatures were several degrees below zero, then yes he may have a point, but he wasn't was he? ladysal

10:54am Wed 3 Oct 12

Fire Fly says...

Totally disagree with this chap going to the papers with this & with the LET printing it & taking a photograph too. Sure this paper would sensationalise the opening of an envelope on a slow news day!

BUT the story does highlight something that our medical professionals forget...when patients go into hospital, regardless of it being planned or as an emergency, people become very vulnerable. You're prodded & poked at, asked to wear gowns that don't afford you much privacy & of course, you are probably quite worried & anxious...you basically have very little say in whats going on & it can be a really frightening & intimidating experience. Your clothing or nightgown are real protectors for people in this situation because as daft as it sounds, they help you feel safe & at ease.

Patients are an every day occurrence for Doctors & Nurses but for us as patients, it's not. We are still people & they need to remember that, we're not simply defined by a medical problem & ultimately a diagnosis.

This man clearly felt vulnerable in the hospital waiting area wearing the pajamas he'd been given & the Nurse did comply with his request that the taxi came closer to help with this but I do think another gown could have been given to him. Small things like that can make massive differences in situations like this & of course might stop stories like this one ever getting to print.

The NHS isn't there to mother us but it can remember that empathy costs nothing.
Totally disagree with this chap going to the papers with this & with the LET printing it & taking a photograph too. Sure this paper would sensationalise the opening of an envelope on a slow news day! BUT the story does highlight something that our medical professionals forget...when patients go into hospital, regardless of it being planned or as an emergency, people become very vulnerable. You're prodded & poked at, asked to wear gowns that don't afford you much privacy & of course, you are probably quite worried & anxious...you basically have very little say in whats going on & it can be a really frightening & intimidating experience. Your clothing or nightgown are real protectors for people in this situation because as daft as it sounds, they help you feel safe & at ease. Patients are an every day occurrence for Doctors & Nurses but for us as patients, it's not. We are still people & they need to remember that, we're not simply defined by a medical problem & ultimately a diagnosis. This man clearly felt vulnerable in the hospital waiting area wearing the pajamas he'd been given & the Nurse did comply with his request that the taxi came closer to help with this but I do think another gown could have been given to him. Small things like that can make massive differences in situations like this & of course might stop stories like this one ever getting to print. The NHS isn't there to mother us but it can remember that empathy costs nothing. Fire Fly

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