Online game shows how East Lancs ambulance staff deal with ‘unusual’ emergencies

Play the new #team999 game, with you as the star

Play the new #team999 game, with you as the star

First published in News
Last updated
Blackburn Citizen: Photograph of the Author by , Health Reporter

AMBULANCE chiefs have created a ‘humorous’ computer game, including animated shark attacks and alien invasions, in a bid to raise awareness about 999 services.

North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) has spent £15,000 to develop and promote a new online game, to educate the public about what can happen when they request an emergency response.

Players can select a photo from Facebook or use the game’s standard purple character to play along.

They are then invited to select a location, and an unusual cause for their injury or illness, ranging from stampedes of horses, giant icebergs, wrecking balls and eating too much junk food.

After players have decided when and how the emergency will take place, the game selects the most appropriate response to the situation, just as the trust’s resource dispatchers do in real life.

NWAS created the game as part of its #team999 campaign, which aims to educate the public about what can happen when calling 999, namely that it does not always result in a response from an emergency ambulance or a trip to the emergency department.

Bob Williams, chief executive at NWAS, said: “There is far more to the modern ambulance service than just emergency ambulances. It’s all about getting the right care for each patient and keeping ambulances free for those with life-threatening conditions.

“Through the randomizer game, we hope to raise awareness amongst younger people, in a humorous way, of what they can expect when calling on the ambulance service for help.”

For information about the game see www.team999.nwas.nhs.uk

Comments (2)

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4:25pm Wed 20 Aug 14

EYESINTHESKY says...

'NWAS created the game as part of its #team999 campaign, which aims to educate the public about what can happen when calling 999, namely that it does not always result in a response from an emergency ambulance or a trip to the emergency department.

Bob Williams, chief executive at NWAS, said: “There is far more to the modern ambulance service than just emergency ambulances. It’s all about getting the right care for each patient and keeping ambulances free for those with life-threatening conditions.'

Seriously, £15000 has been spent on this 'game' when the NHS is in crisis? I don't know whose dumber. Those who spent this or those playing it. Come on. Kids are desensitized enough to reality and real life consequences to actions ie outside their homes by playing 'games' already. But £15000? Really???

If people by now can't understand a process that's been there for decades ... You know? When people behaved responsibly and KNEW how to dial for an ambulance without being wrapped up in cotton wool as to 'what to expect' then there's something really wrong. Or rang for a prank etc to shove on YouTube or threw bricks at ambulances for a 'larf'.

I'm not criticizing NWAS here but those who've spent to most should be a dreadful waste of money which could be used more positively elsewhere for a 'humerous' game.

Coming to something when people are educated through a game. Nice idea in principle but is it gonna work?
'NWAS created the game as part of its #team999 campaign, which aims to educate the public about what can happen when calling 999, namely that it does not always result in a response from an emergency ambulance or a trip to the emergency department. Bob Williams, chief executive at NWAS, said: “There is far more to the modern ambulance service than just emergency ambulances. It’s all about getting the right care for each patient and keeping ambulances free for those with life-threatening conditions.' Seriously, £15000 has been spent on this 'game' when the NHS is in crisis? I don't know whose dumber. Those who spent this or those playing it. Come on. Kids are desensitized enough to reality and real life consequences to actions ie outside their homes by playing 'games' already. But £15000? Really??? If people by now can't understand a process that's been there for decades ... You know? When people behaved responsibly and KNEW how to dial for an ambulance without being wrapped up in cotton wool as to 'what to expect' then there's something really wrong. Or rang for a prank etc to shove on YouTube or threw bricks at ambulances for a 'larf'. I'm not criticizing NWAS here but those who've spent to most should be a dreadful waste of money which could be used more positively elsewhere for a 'humerous' game. Coming to something when people are educated through a game. Nice idea in principle but is it gonna work? EYESINTHESKY
  • Score: 0

4:49pm Wed 20 Aug 14

North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust says...

Hello all,

The Trust would just like to clarify the issue around the cost of this game as this seems to be of concern. The overall cost was £13,000 and that included creative development of the situations and visuals, building of the game, Facebook ads, testing amongst the target audience, evaluation and project management.

The project was funded by CQUIN (commissioning for quality and innovation), which is a separate, additional payment framework that allows NHS commissioners to reward quality and innovation. The Trust applies to its commissioners to deliver various CQUIN projects and, if successful, receives separate funding to deliver them, one of which recently was focused on raising awareness amongst young people of what can happen when you call 999, which this game forms a part of.

Neither the game nor the project was paid for directly out of NWAS funds.

Thank you
Hello all, The Trust would just like to clarify the issue around the cost of this game as this seems to be of concern. The overall cost was £13,000 and that included creative development of the situations and visuals, building of the game, Facebook ads, testing amongst the target audience, evaluation and project management. The project was funded by CQUIN (commissioning for quality and innovation), which is a separate, additional payment framework that allows NHS commissioners to reward quality and innovation. The Trust applies to its commissioners to deliver various CQUIN projects and, if successful, receives separate funding to deliver them, one of which recently was focused on raising awareness amongst young people of what can happen when you call 999, which this game forms a part of. Neither the game nor the project was paid for directly out of NWAS funds. Thank you North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust
  • Score: -1
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