Shock report highlights prison suicides

Shock report highlights prison suicides

Shock report highlights prison suicides

First published in News

THE Howard League for Penal Reform has responded to the Prison and Probation Ombudsman’s learning lessons bulletin on young adult prisoners who died by suicide, published today.

The charity has campaigned for changes to the treatment of young people in custody since the suicide of 14-year-old Burnley prisoner Adam Rickwood in 2004.

The report reveals that, between April 2007 and March 2014, 89 young people aged 18 to 24 took their own lives in prison. Two-thirds of these young people had identified mental health problems and one in five had been subjected to bullying in the month before they died.

Frances Crook, Chief Executive of the Howard League for Penal Reform, said: “Every death in prison is a tragedy and almost all are preventable.

“Prisoners are dying for want of a radio to listen to or a book to read. Cries for help are going unheard. Families’ concerns are being ignored. It is a shocking indictmen.”.”

Comments (2)

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7:24am Thu 14 Aug 14

BuckoTheMoose says...

The only penal reform we need is to take away their play stations and turn prison back into punishment.

These people would have prison officers stand back and do nothing while violent youngsters kick off with them, rather than restraining them as they should do. They would prefer the prison officer be in danger from the actions of the young offender rather than the offender themselves.

All these deaths could indeed have been prevented, quite easily. If these young people had not committed crimes and found themselves in prison, they would still be alive.

We don't need a league for penal reform, we need a league for society reform. Tackle the issues that see young people turn to crime rather than conveniently blaming it on some 'mental health issue', making prison a soft option and taking away the ability of prison officers to do their jobs.
The only penal reform we need is to take away their play stations and turn prison back into punishment. These people would have prison officers stand back and do nothing while violent youngsters kick off with them, rather than restraining them as they should do. They would prefer the prison officer be in danger from the actions of the young offender rather than the offender themselves. All these deaths could indeed have been prevented, quite easily. If these young people had not committed crimes and found themselves in prison, they would still be alive. We don't need a league for penal reform, we need a league for society reform. Tackle the issues that see young people turn to crime rather than conveniently blaming it on some 'mental health issue', making prison a soft option and taking away the ability of prison officers to do their jobs. BuckoTheMoose
  • Score: 1

9:33pm Thu 14 Aug 14

Paul The Octopus Lives! says...

Why don't the Howard League look into how many suicides are the result of redundancy, the loss of a child, the break down of a family relationship and do something about these far more tragic deaths of valuable and honest members of society? I'm not saying prisoners are worthless but people don't go to prison without making other peoples lives worse and usually a lot of people for a long time.
Why don't the Howard League look into how many suicides are the result of redundancy, the loss of a child, the break down of a family relationship and do something about these far more tragic deaths of valuable and honest members of society? I'm not saying prisoners are worthless but people don't go to prison without making other peoples lives worse and usually a lot of people for a long time. Paul The Octopus Lives!
  • Score: 0

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