Fracking will not wreck our East Lancs ales, say Thwaites, Moorhouse’s and Moonstone

Moorhouse’s managing director David Grant has no concerns

Moorhouse’s managing director David Grant has no concerns

First published in News Blackburn Citizen: Photograph of the Author by , Local government reporter

BREWERS big and small have moved swiftly to head off fears that fracking could ruin the taste of East Lancashire drinkers’ pints.

They are confident even if the controversial drilling for shale gas does come to the area, it will not leave a bitter taste in ale lovers’ mouths.

After Friends of the Earth backed the concerns of German brewers, Blackburn’s Thwaites and Burnley microbrewers Moonstone pledged they could deal with potential problems.

FoE’s North-West campaigner Helen Rimmer said: “Fracking poses a number of threats to our environment, and brewers are right to be concerned about the impact on water quality “Beer makers in Germany are fiercely opposed to the practice, arguing that their products may be seriously tainted.”

Caudrilla, the company test drilling in West Lancashire, stressed its commitment to wellhead integrity ensuring groundwater is not contaminated.

The fears centre on the process releasing chemicals, gases and other impurites into watercourses, particularly affecting brewers who get their own water from boreholes.

Thwaites have a dedicated well at their current Star brewery and plan another using the same water source when the company moves to Mellor Brook in two years time.

Other local brewers, including Moorhouses in Burnley, Moonstone and Three Bs in Darwen use treated mains water.

Last year a British Geological Survey identified the M65 corridor north of Blackburn through Burnley to Colne and the Rossendale Valley as sitting on shale gas reserves.

Thwaites managing director Steve Magnall said: “We are aware of the discussions taking place around fracking and potential environmental effects.

“With a borehole at a brewery, the water goes through a filter system, whereby all the salts and other minerals are stripped out, leaving pure water.

“It is a tried and tested technology. Any contamination at groundwater level would, via suitable filtration, be safe and potable.

“We would like to put a borehole in at Mellor Brook and would have the systems in place.”

Mick Jacques of Moonstone on Trafalgar Street, said: “We use mains water and we’re not aware fracking is going to be a problem for us.

“We treat our water carefully and could preserve the taste if any possible problem occurred.”

A Cuadrilla spokesman said: “The well pads and wells themselves have been designed so that leaks or spills do not enter the wider environment (the soil, groundwater, surface water or atmosphere) and lead to contamination.”

Comments (13)

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10:06am Thu 26 Jun 14

Jack Herer says...

Be wary of those who are against fracking.

As was revealed recently, the corrupt, oppressive Russian regime is very much active in anti-fracking field, because it threatens their own greedy gas and oil interests.

I certainly found it strange a while back when I heard one of the main anti-fracking campaigners down in Boscombe with a distinctly Russia accent.

Of course everyone against fracking won't be in the pay of Putin, but they will all certainly benefit from the false and skewed anti-fracking spew from Russia's long tentacled propaganda machine.

The cold hard truth is that fracking must very much be in the interests of Britain if Putin, and his shockingly corrupt regime, is so keen to see it not go ahead.
Be wary of those who are against fracking. As was revealed recently, the corrupt, oppressive Russian regime is very much active in anti-fracking field, because it threatens their own greedy gas and oil interests. I certainly found it strange a while back when I heard one of the main anti-fracking campaigners down in Boscombe with a distinctly Russia accent. Of course everyone against fracking won't be in the pay of Putin, but they will all certainly benefit from the false and skewed anti-fracking spew from Russia's long tentacled propaganda machine. The cold hard truth is that fracking must very much be in the interests of Britain if Putin, and his shockingly corrupt regime, is so keen to see it not go ahead. Jack Herer
  • Score: -20

11:44am Thu 26 Jun 14

Khaki Kezzza says...

I find it curious that despite the whole of France banning fracking - due to the opposition from the wine making community, and despite the whole of Germany banning fracking - due to the pressure from the brewers, these two local brewers feel that it is fine to frack Lancashire.
I'm one of a ever increasing and expanding community of East Lancashire people who have in past months come together as KELFF - Keep East Lancashire Frack Free who is certain that fracking poses a real and present danger to local food growing and production and brewing.
I would urge these two men to seek out the work of Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell University. Ingraffea is a professor of engineering at Cornell University as well as the president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc. and an expert on cement, an integral part of every fracking well. He states categorically that in the first year around 5% of wells fail and after 30 years all wells will fail. This means undoubtedly that Moorhouses bore will be threatened IF we sit back and allow these frackers to pursue their deluded dreams.
After three years of seeking the truth about fracking I could sit and talk to our local brewers for days and days and days as to why it is so important we stop Cuadrilla now.
So, it'll be up to the Ministry for a swift half after our next KELFF meeting. Thanks for the heads up Bill.
I find it curious that despite the whole of France banning fracking - due to the opposition from the wine making community, and despite the whole of Germany banning fracking - due to the pressure from the brewers, these two local brewers feel that it is fine to frack Lancashire. I'm one of a ever increasing and expanding community of East Lancashire people who have in past months come together as KELFF - Keep East Lancashire Frack Free who is certain that fracking poses a real and present danger to local food growing and production and brewing. I would urge these two men to seek out the work of Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell University. Ingraffea is a professor of engineering at Cornell University as well as the president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc. and an expert on cement, an integral part of every fracking well. He states categorically that in the first year around 5% of wells fail and after 30 years all wells will fail. This means undoubtedly that Moorhouses bore will be threatened IF we sit back and allow these frackers to pursue their deluded dreams. After three years of seeking the truth about fracking I could sit and talk to our local brewers for days and days and days as to why it is so important we stop Cuadrilla now. So, it'll be up to the Ministry for a swift half after our next KELFF meeting. Thanks for the heads up Bill. Khaki Kezzza
  • Score: 26

11:56am Thu 26 Jun 14

RibbleLad says...

Khaki Kezzza wrote:
I find it curious that despite the whole of France banning fracking - due to the opposition from the wine making community, and despite the whole of Germany banning fracking - due to the pressure from the brewers, these two local brewers feel that it is fine to frack Lancashire.
I'm one of a ever increasing and expanding community of East Lancashire people who have in past months come together as KELFF - Keep East Lancashire Frack Free who is certain that fracking poses a real and present danger to local food growing and production and brewing.
I would urge these two men to seek out the work of Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell University. Ingraffea is a professor of engineering at Cornell University as well as the president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc. and an expert on cement, an integral part of every fracking well. He states categorically that in the first year around 5% of wells fail and after 30 years all wells will fail. This means undoubtedly that Moorhouses bore will be threatened IF we sit back and allow these frackers to pursue their deluded dreams.
After three years of seeking the truth about fracking I could sit and talk to our local brewers for days and days and days as to why it is so important we stop Cuadrilla now.
So, it'll be up to the Ministry for a swift half after our next KELFF meeting. Thanks for the heads up Bill.
Read the article before letting off.

Moorhouses do not have a bore hole but use suitably treated mains water in their brewing process.
[quote][p][bold]Khaki Kezzza[/bold] wrote: I find it curious that despite the whole of France banning fracking - due to the opposition from the wine making community, and despite the whole of Germany banning fracking - due to the pressure from the brewers, these two local brewers feel that it is fine to frack Lancashire. I'm one of a ever increasing and expanding community of East Lancashire people who have in past months come together as KELFF - Keep East Lancashire Frack Free who is certain that fracking poses a real and present danger to local food growing and production and brewing. I would urge these two men to seek out the work of Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell University. Ingraffea is a professor of engineering at Cornell University as well as the president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc. and an expert on cement, an integral part of every fracking well. He states categorically that in the first year around 5% of wells fail and after 30 years all wells will fail. This means undoubtedly that Moorhouses bore will be threatened IF we sit back and allow these frackers to pursue their deluded dreams. After three years of seeking the truth about fracking I could sit and talk to our local brewers for days and days and days as to why it is so important we stop Cuadrilla now. So, it'll be up to the Ministry for a swift half after our next KELFF meeting. Thanks for the heads up Bill.[/p][/quote]Read the article before letting off. Moorhouses do not have a bore hole but use suitably treated mains water in their brewing process. RibbleLad
  • Score: -12

12:22pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Jack Herer says...

Khaki Kezzza wrote:
I find it curious that despite the whole of France banning fracking - due to the opposition from the wine making community, and despite the whole of Germany banning fracking - due to the pressure from the brewers, these two local brewers feel that it is fine to frack Lancashire.
I'm one of a ever increasing and expanding community of East Lancashire people who have in past months come together as KELFF - Keep East Lancashire Frack Free who is certain that fracking poses a real and present danger to local food growing and production and brewing.
I would urge these two men to seek out the work of Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell University. Ingraffea is a professor of engineering at Cornell University as well as the president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc. and an expert on cement, an integral part of every fracking well. He states categorically that in the first year around 5% of wells fail and after 30 years all wells will fail. This means undoubtedly that Moorhouses bore will be threatened IF we sit back and allow these frackers to pursue their deluded dreams.
After three years of seeking the truth about fracking I could sit and talk to our local brewers for days and days and days as to why it is so important we stop Cuadrilla now.
So, it'll be up to the Ministry for a swift half after our next KELFF meeting. Thanks for the heads up Bill.
Being president of an organisation as mickey mouse sounding as Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc, hardly seems something to shout about.

It sounds exactly like those organisations of similar experts who cherry picked stuff to claim that the Twin Towers were brought down by missiles, thermite, explosives, or energy beams (delete as appropriate as each one was similarly debunked).

Face facts, the anti-fracking rhetoric is pretty much entirely scare-mongering and cherry picking to suit their already pre-determined conclusions.

I have no self interest whatsoever in fracking except seeing what's best for Britain in general. Look up my comments on here if you don't believe me. Just search for my name. I clearly have no affiliation with big business and I have no qualms berating government or organisations when I think they are in the wrong when it comes to a wide range of issues.

Looking at the facts without blinkers, fracking isn't one of those issues though. If it was I'd say so.

Fracking is overwhelming good for Britain, and especially Lancashire. That's just the cold hard truth.
[quote][p][bold]Khaki Kezzza[/bold] wrote: I find it curious that despite the whole of France banning fracking - due to the opposition from the wine making community, and despite the whole of Germany banning fracking - due to the pressure from the brewers, these two local brewers feel that it is fine to frack Lancashire. I'm one of a ever increasing and expanding community of East Lancashire people who have in past months come together as KELFF - Keep East Lancashire Frack Free who is certain that fracking poses a real and present danger to local food growing and production and brewing. I would urge these two men to seek out the work of Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell University. Ingraffea is a professor of engineering at Cornell University as well as the president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc. and an expert on cement, an integral part of every fracking well. He states categorically that in the first year around 5% of wells fail and after 30 years all wells will fail. This means undoubtedly that Moorhouses bore will be threatened IF we sit back and allow these frackers to pursue their deluded dreams. After three years of seeking the truth about fracking I could sit and talk to our local brewers for days and days and days as to why it is so important we stop Cuadrilla now. So, it'll be up to the Ministry for a swift half after our next KELFF meeting. Thanks for the heads up Bill.[/p][/quote]Being president of an organisation as mickey mouse sounding as Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc, hardly seems something to shout about. It sounds exactly like those organisations of similar experts who cherry picked stuff to claim that the Twin Towers were brought down by missiles, thermite, explosives, or energy beams (delete as appropriate as each one was similarly debunked). Face facts, the anti-fracking rhetoric is pretty much entirely scare-mongering and cherry picking to suit their already pre-determined conclusions. I have no self interest whatsoever in fracking except seeing what's best for Britain in general. Look up my comments on here if you don't believe me. Just search for my name. I clearly have no affiliation with big business and I have no qualms berating government or organisations when I think they are in the wrong when it comes to a wide range of issues. Looking at the facts without blinkers, fracking isn't one of those issues though. If it was I'd say so. Fracking is overwhelming good for Britain, and especially Lancashire. That's just the cold hard truth. Jack Herer
  • Score: -16

1:02pm Thu 26 Jun 14

GracesDad says...

Jack Herer wrote:
Khaki Kezzza wrote:
I find it curious that despite the whole of France banning fracking - due to the opposition from the wine making community, and despite the whole of Germany banning fracking - due to the pressure from the brewers, these two local brewers feel that it is fine to frack Lancashire.
I'm one of a ever increasing and expanding community of East Lancashire people who have in past months come together as KELFF - Keep East Lancashire Frack Free who is certain that fracking poses a real and present danger to local food growing and production and brewing.
I would urge these two men to seek out the work of Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell University. Ingraffea is a professor of engineering at Cornell University as well as the president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc. and an expert on cement, an integral part of every fracking well. He states categorically that in the first year around 5% of wells fail and after 30 years all wells will fail. This means undoubtedly that Moorhouses bore will be threatened IF we sit back and allow these frackers to pursue their deluded dreams.
After three years of seeking the truth about fracking I could sit and talk to our local brewers for days and days and days as to why it is so important we stop Cuadrilla now.
So, it'll be up to the Ministry for a swift half after our next KELFF meeting. Thanks for the heads up Bill.
Being president of an organisation as mickey mouse sounding as Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc, hardly seems something to shout about.

It sounds exactly like those organisations of similar experts who cherry picked stuff to claim that the Twin Towers were brought down by missiles, thermite, explosives, or energy beams (delete as appropriate as each one was similarly debunked).

Face facts, the anti-fracking rhetoric is pretty much entirely scare-mongering and cherry picking to suit their already pre-determined conclusions.

I have no self interest whatsoever in fracking except seeing what's best for Britain in general. Look up my comments on here if you don't believe me. Just search for my name. I clearly have no affiliation with big business and I have no qualms berating government or organisations when I think they are in the wrong when it comes to a wide range of issues.

Looking at the facts without blinkers, fracking isn't one of those issues though. If it was I'd say so.

Fracking is overwhelming good for Britain, and especially Lancashire. That's just the cold hard truth.
Experts suggest that fracking would provide no more that 50 years supply of gas to Britain. It is clearly a short-term solution to a long-term problem.

I do not want copious amounts of toxic substances being pumped into the ground beneath my feet so that we can get only 50 years worth of fuel out!

Fracking is clearly a cheap option so it is favoured by the government. We would be far better off looking at long-term renewable energy sources like offshore windfarms even if they cost more to create.
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Khaki Kezzza[/bold] wrote: I find it curious that despite the whole of France banning fracking - due to the opposition from the wine making community, and despite the whole of Germany banning fracking - due to the pressure from the brewers, these two local brewers feel that it is fine to frack Lancashire. I'm one of a ever increasing and expanding community of East Lancashire people who have in past months come together as KELFF - Keep East Lancashire Frack Free who is certain that fracking poses a real and present danger to local food growing and production and brewing. I would urge these two men to seek out the work of Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell University. Ingraffea is a professor of engineering at Cornell University as well as the president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc. and an expert on cement, an integral part of every fracking well. He states categorically that in the first year around 5% of wells fail and after 30 years all wells will fail. This means undoubtedly that Moorhouses bore will be threatened IF we sit back and allow these frackers to pursue their deluded dreams. After three years of seeking the truth about fracking I could sit and talk to our local brewers for days and days and days as to why it is so important we stop Cuadrilla now. So, it'll be up to the Ministry for a swift half after our next KELFF meeting. Thanks for the heads up Bill.[/p][/quote]Being president of an organisation as mickey mouse sounding as Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc, hardly seems something to shout about. It sounds exactly like those organisations of similar experts who cherry picked stuff to claim that the Twin Towers were brought down by missiles, thermite, explosives, or energy beams (delete as appropriate as each one was similarly debunked). Face facts, the anti-fracking rhetoric is pretty much entirely scare-mongering and cherry picking to suit their already pre-determined conclusions. I have no self interest whatsoever in fracking except seeing what's best for Britain in general. Look up my comments on here if you don't believe me. Just search for my name. I clearly have no affiliation with big business and I have no qualms berating government or organisations when I think they are in the wrong when it comes to a wide range of issues. Looking at the facts without blinkers, fracking isn't one of those issues though. If it was I'd say so. Fracking is overwhelming good for Britain, and especially Lancashire. That's just the cold hard truth.[/p][/quote]Experts suggest that fracking would provide no more that 50 years supply of gas to Britain. It is clearly a short-term solution to a long-term problem. I do not want copious amounts of toxic substances being pumped into the ground beneath my feet so that we can get only 50 years worth of fuel out! Fracking is clearly a cheap option so it is favoured by the government. We would be far better off looking at long-term renewable energy sources like offshore windfarms even if they cost more to create. GracesDad
  • Score: 15

2:20pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Jack Herer says...

GracesDad wrote:
Jack Herer wrote:
Khaki Kezzza wrote:
I find it curious that despite the whole of France banning fracking - due to the opposition from the wine making community, and despite the whole of Germany banning fracking - due to the pressure from the brewers, these two local brewers feel that it is fine to frack Lancashire.
I'm one of a ever increasing and expanding community of East Lancashire people who have in past months come together as KELFF - Keep East Lancashire Frack Free who is certain that fracking poses a real and present danger to local food growing and production and brewing.
I would urge these two men to seek out the work of Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell University. Ingraffea is a professor of engineering at Cornell University as well as the president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc. and an expert on cement, an integral part of every fracking well. He states categorically that in the first year around 5% of wells fail and after 30 years all wells will fail. This means undoubtedly that Moorhouses bore will be threatened IF we sit back and allow these frackers to pursue their deluded dreams.
After three years of seeking the truth about fracking I could sit and talk to our local brewers for days and days and days as to why it is so important we stop Cuadrilla now.
So, it'll be up to the Ministry for a swift half after our next KELFF meeting. Thanks for the heads up Bill.
Being president of an organisation as mickey mouse sounding as Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc, hardly seems something to shout about.

It sounds exactly like those organisations of similar experts who cherry picked stuff to claim that the Twin Towers were brought down by missiles, thermite, explosives, or energy beams (delete as appropriate as each one was similarly debunked).

Face facts, the anti-fracking rhetoric is pretty much entirely scare-mongering and cherry picking to suit their already pre-determined conclusions.

I have no self interest whatsoever in fracking except seeing what's best for Britain in general. Look up my comments on here if you don't believe me. Just search for my name. I clearly have no affiliation with big business and I have no qualms berating government or organisations when I think they are in the wrong when it comes to a wide range of issues.

Looking at the facts without blinkers, fracking isn't one of those issues though. If it was I'd say so.

Fracking is overwhelming good for Britain, and especially Lancashire. That's just the cold hard truth.
Experts suggest that fracking would provide no more that 50 years supply of gas to Britain. It is clearly a short-term solution to a long-term problem.

I do not want copious amounts of toxic substances being pumped into the ground beneath my feet so that we can get only 50 years worth of fuel out!

Fracking is clearly a cheap option so it is favoured by the government. We would be far better off looking at long-term renewable energy sources like offshore windfarms even if they cost more to create.
Off-shore wind farms will not solve our energy issues. Not unless we invest massively.

As a country, we've stopped the green energy subsidy. Everyone cheered when that happened.

To get green energy to viably provide our energy needs, we needed that subsidy, and more. We don't have it though.

Thinking that renewable energy sources can currently, or in the medium term, provide our energy needs, is living in cloud cuckoo land. I wish that wasn't the case, but it just is.

The options are relying on corrupt, oppressive foreign regimes, who will happily use energy supply as a weapon, or fracking. Again I wish it wasn't the case, but it just is.

You are not being truthful when you say that fracking would pump "copious amounts of toxic substances" into the ground. It wouldn't.

Fracking works by pumping a mixture overwhelmingly made up of water and sand into the rock well below the water table. Other things added are far less than an average industrial unit will pour down their drains - which actually has a chance to enter our water supply.

As I say, my opinion is with an unbiased mind. If I thought fracking was dangerous or not in Britain's interests, I would be campaigning against it.

As it stands though, the anti-fracking campaign is driven by half-truths and already debunked scare stories. Not to mention propaganda by self interested corrupt parties such as Russia.

It doesn't take a genius to understand that established fossil fuel organisations have an interest in stopping fracking. Don't be fooled therefore by greedy, selfish interests dressing themselves up as champions of decency. They aren't.
[quote][p][bold]GracesDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Khaki Kezzza[/bold] wrote: I find it curious that despite the whole of France banning fracking - due to the opposition from the wine making community, and despite the whole of Germany banning fracking - due to the pressure from the brewers, these two local brewers feel that it is fine to frack Lancashire. I'm one of a ever increasing and expanding community of East Lancashire people who have in past months come together as KELFF - Keep East Lancashire Frack Free who is certain that fracking poses a real and present danger to local food growing and production and brewing. I would urge these two men to seek out the work of Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell University. Ingraffea is a professor of engineering at Cornell University as well as the president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc. and an expert on cement, an integral part of every fracking well. He states categorically that in the first year around 5% of wells fail and after 30 years all wells will fail. This means undoubtedly that Moorhouses bore will be threatened IF we sit back and allow these frackers to pursue their deluded dreams. After three years of seeking the truth about fracking I could sit and talk to our local brewers for days and days and days as to why it is so important we stop Cuadrilla now. So, it'll be up to the Ministry for a swift half after our next KELFF meeting. Thanks for the heads up Bill.[/p][/quote]Being president of an organisation as mickey mouse sounding as Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy Inc, hardly seems something to shout about. It sounds exactly like those organisations of similar experts who cherry picked stuff to claim that the Twin Towers were brought down by missiles, thermite, explosives, or energy beams (delete as appropriate as each one was similarly debunked). Face facts, the anti-fracking rhetoric is pretty much entirely scare-mongering and cherry picking to suit their already pre-determined conclusions. I have no self interest whatsoever in fracking except seeing what's best for Britain in general. Look up my comments on here if you don't believe me. Just search for my name. I clearly have no affiliation with big business and I have no qualms berating government or organisations when I think they are in the wrong when it comes to a wide range of issues. Looking at the facts without blinkers, fracking isn't one of those issues though. If it was I'd say so. Fracking is overwhelming good for Britain, and especially Lancashire. That's just the cold hard truth.[/p][/quote]Experts suggest that fracking would provide no more that 50 years supply of gas to Britain. It is clearly a short-term solution to a long-term problem. I do not want copious amounts of toxic substances being pumped into the ground beneath my feet so that we can get only 50 years worth of fuel out! Fracking is clearly a cheap option so it is favoured by the government. We would be far better off looking at long-term renewable energy sources like offshore windfarms even if they cost more to create.[/p][/quote]Off-shore wind farms will not solve our energy issues. Not unless we invest massively. As a country, we've stopped the green energy subsidy. Everyone cheered when that happened. To get green energy to viably provide our energy needs, we needed that subsidy, and more. We don't have it though. Thinking that renewable energy sources can currently, or in the medium term, provide our energy needs, is living in cloud cuckoo land. I wish that wasn't the case, but it just is. The options are relying on corrupt, oppressive foreign regimes, who will happily use energy supply as a weapon, or fracking. Again I wish it wasn't the case, but it just is. You are not being truthful when you say that fracking would pump "copious amounts of toxic substances" into the ground. It wouldn't. Fracking works by pumping a mixture overwhelmingly made up of water and sand into the rock well below the water table. Other things added are far less than an average industrial unit will pour down their drains - which actually has a chance to enter our water supply. As I say, my opinion is with an unbiased mind. If I thought fracking was dangerous or not in Britain's interests, I would be campaigning against it. As it stands though, the anti-fracking campaign is driven by half-truths and already debunked scare stories. Not to mention propaganda by self interested corrupt parties such as Russia. It doesn't take a genius to understand that established fossil fuel organisations have an interest in stopping fracking. Don't be fooled therefore by greedy, selfish interests dressing themselves up as champions of decency. They aren't. Jack Herer
  • Score: -10

2:24pm Thu 26 Jun 14

the beaver says...

Its beyond me the purpose of all this when we spend billions on green energy to then turn to this. Once you pollute the water course its only nature that can put it right over say a hundred years. What for 50 years of gas and back to square one? wind farms are the short term answer. The best one I have seen but in its infancy is solar roads look it up on youtube. Blasting rock a mile down under homes and city's is wrong. What about all the thousands of miles of disused mine shafts some that there is no records of and underground caves and lakes. Houses and roads could suddenly disappear. The earth could really move while your getting your jolly's with the Mrs!
Its beyond me the purpose of all this when we spend billions on green energy to then turn to this. Once you pollute the water course its only nature that can put it right over say a hundred years. What for 50 years of gas and back to square one? wind farms are the short term answer. The best one I have seen but in its infancy is solar roads look it up on youtube. Blasting rock a mile down under homes and city's is wrong. What about all the thousands of miles of disused mine shafts some that there is no records of and underground caves and lakes. Houses and roads could suddenly disappear. The earth could really move while your getting your jolly's with the Mrs! the beaver
  • Score: 10

2:32pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Jack Herer says...

the beaver wrote:
Its beyond me the purpose of all this when we spend billions on green energy to then turn to this. Once you pollute the water course its only nature that can put it right over say a hundred years. What for 50 years of gas and back to square one? wind farms are the short term answer. The best one I have seen but in its infancy is solar roads look it up on youtube. Blasting rock a mile down under homes and city's is wrong. What about all the thousands of miles of disused mine shafts some that there is no records of and underground caves and lakes. Houses and roads could suddenly disappear. The earth could really move while your getting your jolly's with the Mrs!
Listen to Public Enemy.

Don't Believe the Hype.

Wind farms are not the short term answer. For starters everyone moans about them too when it suits them.

There is no perfect answer unfortunately, and fracking is just the best of the bunch.
[quote][p][bold]the beaver[/bold] wrote: Its beyond me the purpose of all this when we spend billions on green energy to then turn to this. Once you pollute the water course its only nature that can put it right over say a hundred years. What for 50 years of gas and back to square one? wind farms are the short term answer. The best one I have seen but in its infancy is solar roads look it up on youtube. Blasting rock a mile down under homes and city's is wrong. What about all the thousands of miles of disused mine shafts some that there is no records of and underground caves and lakes. Houses and roads could suddenly disappear. The earth could really move while your getting your jolly's with the Mrs![/p][/quote]Listen to Public Enemy. Don't Believe the Hype. Wind farms are not the short term answer. For starters everyone moans about them too when it suits them. There is no perfect answer unfortunately, and fracking is just the best of the bunch. Jack Herer
  • Score: -12

6:18pm Thu 26 Jun 14

phil kernot says...

Another. Bit of propaganda in favour of fracking ,,, who has invested big money in this madness mr Cameron and senior members of the house of lords and who changed the law on trespass so they could drill under your houses ,,, you've guessed it mr Cameron and his cronies in the house of lords ,,,corruption ££££corruption
Another. Bit of propaganda in favour of fracking ,,, who has invested big money in this madness mr Cameron and senior members of the house of lords and who changed the law on trespass so they could drill under your houses ,,, you've guessed it mr Cameron and his cronies in the house of lords ,,,corruption ££££corruption phil kernot
  • Score: 12

7:10pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Bluestew says...

All wells leak in the end. What with Normally Occurring Radioactive materials (NORMs) and the hundreds of chemicals used per frack, over time fracking causes water contamination. A legacy of pollution that will most certainly be apparent for future generations to deal with.
Over 60% of the UK is licensed under exploration licences for drilling, sitting over already highly faulted fractured rock, the geology of our water aquifers is largely unknown in its complexity and connections, and contamination in one place means migration to other places.
Well failure in swathes of the frack belts of the US is proliferating and their shale basins are less naturally faulted than British geology.
The placating of brewery bosses by Cuadrilla shows that cash talks in silencing industries. Cuadrilla especially having a bad track record for such a young company having flouted regulation...(those "Golden Regulations the government keep talking of.)...from day one. Remember the earth tremors of Cuadrilla's Preese Hall fracking site in 2011 and the storage of highly contaminated frack waste stored for months in containers then thousands of tonnes just dumped in the Manchester Ship
Canal. And the companies flouting of regulations at Balcombe 2013.

Despite industry and governmental spin, the people of Britain do not want this toxic industry that will not produce cheaper fuel to the user even Lord Browne of Cuadrilla has admitted this, will not hold the UK in the hands to Russia, as we do not get our gas from Russia, that's the propaganda of a war mongering government. The toxic legacy of this industry is apparent if you research for it outside the mainstream spin who want to see this short term dirty energy proliferate to make profits for the few at the peril of the nations health of the people, our countryside and ecology and our water.
All wells leak in the end. What with Normally Occurring Radioactive materials (NORMs) and the hundreds of chemicals used per frack, over time fracking causes water contamination. A legacy of pollution that will most certainly be apparent for future generations to deal with. Over 60% of the UK is licensed under exploration licences for drilling, sitting over already highly faulted fractured rock, the geology of our water aquifers is largely unknown in its complexity and connections, and contamination in one place means migration to other places. Well failure in swathes of the frack belts of the US is proliferating and their shale basins are less naturally faulted than British geology. The placating of brewery bosses by Cuadrilla shows that cash talks in silencing industries. Cuadrilla especially having a bad track record for such a young company having flouted regulation...(those "Golden Regulations the government keep talking of.)...from day one. Remember the earth tremors of Cuadrilla's Preese Hall fracking site in 2011 and the storage of highly contaminated frack waste stored for months in containers then thousands of tonnes just dumped in the Manchester Ship Canal. And the companies flouting of regulations at Balcombe 2013. Despite industry and governmental spin, the people of Britain do not want this toxic industry that will not produce cheaper fuel to the user even Lord Browne of Cuadrilla has admitted this, will not hold the UK in the hands to Russia, as we do not get our gas from Russia, that's the propaganda of a war mongering government. The toxic legacy of this industry is apparent if you research for it outside the mainstream spin who want to see this short term dirty energy proliferate to make profits for the few at the peril of the nations health of the people, our countryside and ecology and our water. Bluestew
  • Score: 14

6:23am Fri 27 Jun 14

Fracksceptic says...

Well I suppose the German brewers do have to comply with the Reinheitsgebot, the oldest consumer protection law and a guarantee of beer quality, Obviously our pals at Thwaites don't need to comply with such irritating trivia. I know whose beer I'll not be drinking in future, Mr Magnall.
Well I suppose the German brewers do have to comply with the Reinheitsgebot, the oldest consumer protection law and a guarantee of beer quality, Obviously our pals at Thwaites don't need to comply with such irritating trivia. I know whose beer I'll not be drinking in future, Mr Magnall. Fracksceptic
  • Score: 4

10:22am Fri 27 Jun 14

Real Ale Up North says...

Fracksceptic wrote:
Well I suppose the German brewers do have to comply with the Reinheitsgebot, the oldest consumer protection law and a guarantee of beer quality, Obviously our pals at Thwaites don't need to comply with such irritating trivia. I know whose beer I'll not be drinking in future, Mr Magnall.
A tad unfair on Thwaites. Some of their 'Signature Range' ales are exceptional. You will be missing out on a number of quality quaffs. :-)
[quote][p][bold]Fracksceptic[/bold] wrote: Well I suppose the German brewers do have to comply with the Reinheitsgebot, the oldest consumer protection law and a guarantee of beer quality, Obviously our pals at Thwaites don't need to comply with such irritating trivia. I know whose beer I'll not be drinking in future, Mr Magnall.[/p][/quote]A tad unfair on Thwaites. Some of their 'Signature Range' ales are exceptional. You will be missing out on a number of quality quaffs. :-) Real Ale Up North
  • Score: 1

12:25pm Sat 28 Jun 14

Frack aware says...

To the owners of breweries - you seriously need to start doing some research - here is one for starters...http://ns
nbc.me/2014/06/27/pr
oof-ground-water-con
taminated-due-fracki
ng-fluid/
Do not believe the outright lies of Michael Fallon- water contamination from fracking has now been conclusively proven in 4 US states and the first civil law suit has been won by the Parr family, who had their well poisoned and suffered extreme health effects from fracking contamination. No matter what the bribes and the pay offs to try and win public opinion the truth will Out. Research the work of Dr Theo Colborn, Dr Tony Ingraffea, Dr Sandra Steingraber.....with increasingly alarming evidence emerging from the USA and Australia why would we put ourselves at such risk? As for the ludicrous post by Jack Herer..... We don't get our gas from Russia. It comes from Quatar and Norway. Put your Daily Mail down for a minute and use the thing called the Internet to do some research.
To the owners of breweries - you seriously need to start doing some research - here is one for starters...http://ns nbc.me/2014/06/27/pr oof-ground-water-con taminated-due-fracki ng-fluid/ Do not believe the outright lies of Michael Fallon- water contamination from fracking has now been conclusively proven in 4 US states and the first civil law suit has been won by the Parr family, who had their well poisoned and suffered extreme health effects from fracking contamination. No matter what the bribes and the pay offs to try and win public opinion the truth will Out. Research the work of Dr Theo Colborn, Dr Tony Ingraffea, Dr Sandra Steingraber.....with increasingly alarming evidence emerging from the USA and Australia why would we put ourselves at such risk? As for the ludicrous post by Jack Herer..... We don't get our gas from Russia. It comes from Quatar and Norway. Put your Daily Mail down for a minute and use the thing called the Internet to do some research. Frack aware
  • Score: 3

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