Pledge to get 97% of Lancashire on ‘superfast’ broadband

Blackburn Citizen: Pledge to get 97% of Lancashire on ‘superfast’ broadband Pledge to get 97% of Lancashire on ‘superfast’ broadband

EXTRA efforts have been pledged to bring ‘superfast’ broadband to parts of East Lancashire which are currently not destined to be reached by a £130million communications initiative.

County and borough council bosses and BT hope that eventually 97 per cent of Lancashire will have access to high-speed fibre broadband as part of its Superfast Lancashire scheme.

And Steve Edwards, director of BT’s Next Generation Access north division, has confirmed to county councillors that places like Samlesbury and Gisburn, not currently covered as part of the programme, may still benefit.

Mr Edwards told a county council executive meeting: “We are looking at additional things which we can do to get through to these communities.”

Another area previously not included in the original specifications – Dunsop Bridge, near Clitheroe – would now be covered, he added.

The Enterprise Zone, at Samlesbury, would be covered under a different exchange, he explained, which did not extend to residential properties in the nearby village.

He confirmed that to date, 300 cabinets had been installed across the county, providing access to high-speed broadband for 370,000 homes, including properties in parts of Blackburn, Bacup, Accrington, Nelson and Burnley.

Under the next phase of the scheme’s roll-out, by the end of June, more areas of Burnley, Belmont, Barnoldswick, Salterforth, Whitworth, Shawforth, Mellor, Mellor Brook, Ribchester, Bolton-by-Bowland and West Bradford should be covered.

County councillors were told that BT’s break-even figure for broadband take-up was 20 per cent of properties – the current level is 7.6 per cent.

If 30 per cent of potential customers signed up, £4million would be ‘reinvested’ back into the programme by BT, said Mr Edwards, and this figure would reach £9million if 50 per cent took up the ‘superfast’ option.

County council leader Jennifer Mein said: “Everyone will agree that this is a really positive picture and the ambition to have 97 per cent of the county covered is a big achievement.”

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

10:46am Mon 10 Mar 14

Black Car Guy. says...

The question is how much will it cost for the home owners to get the super fast broadband?
The question is how much will it cost for the home owners to get the super fast broadband? Black Car Guy.
  • Score: 1

8:53am Tue 11 Mar 14

chrisconder says...

The problem with the low take up is because they are only deploying 'superfast' where broadband services already exist.

They would have far better take up if they did the hardest to reach places first. B4RN has 100% take up in some areas, the lowest being around 50%.

What BT are doing is increasing the digital divide, leaving even more people in the digital slow lane but protecting their copper assets for another decade.

The councils have not seen the Emperor has no clothes. Or they choose to ignore it. Or they are stupid. Or they are corrupt. Or they just don't care that many on long line lengths won't get a decent service. Dunno how Lancashire people can be conned in this way. We usually have far more common sense than most. We are not alone though, every council has fallen for the same hype. By 2020 BT will have moved into 'content' ie sport, films etc. and openreach will be handed back to the government and told to 'fix it yourselves' and then we'll get real fibre.
Until then they plodge on with their silly copper cabinets and the fools think its 'fibre broadband'.
It isn't fibre broadband if it comes through a phone line.
No more than dial up isn't fibre broadband, its fed from the same place!
The problem with the low take up is because they are only deploying 'superfast' where broadband services already exist. They would have far better take up if they did the hardest to reach places first. B4RN has 100% take up in some areas, the lowest being around 50%. What BT are doing is increasing the digital divide, leaving even more people in the digital slow lane but protecting their copper assets for another decade. The councils have not seen the Emperor has no clothes. Or they choose to ignore it. Or they are stupid. Or they are corrupt. Or they just don't care that many on long line lengths won't get a decent service. Dunno how Lancashire people can be conned in this way. We usually have far more common sense than most. We are not alone though, every council has fallen for the same hype. By 2020 BT will have moved into 'content' ie sport, films etc. and openreach will be handed back to the government and told to 'fix it yourselves' and then we'll get real fibre. Until then they plodge on with their silly copper cabinets and the fools think its 'fibre broadband'. It isn't fibre broadband if it comes through a phone line. No more than dial up isn't fibre broadband, its fed from the same place! chrisconder
  • Score: 0

8:56pm Tue 11 Mar 14

danielmeah says...

its not fibre optic broadband its a hybrid service. so the the excuse about them protecting copper is silly as the FTTC is mostly copper anyway. the only part that changes on FTTC is the DSLAM is in a road cab instead of the exchange.

from your home to the cabinet its all copper. (the same copper that has existed for many years)
its not fibre optic broadband its a hybrid service. so the the excuse about them protecting copper is silly as the FTTC is mostly copper anyway. the only part that changes on FTTC is the DSLAM is in a road cab instead of the exchange. from your home to the cabinet its all copper. (the same copper that has existed for many years) danielmeah
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree