Working class will ‘feel brunt of cuts’ in Church

Blackburn Citizen: Coun Joan Smith Coun Joan Smith

WORKING class households in Hyndburn will feel the brunt of the government’s cuts, it was claimed.

Church councillor Joan Smith said, on the Hyndburn Labour party’s blog, the bulk of welfare is spent of pensions.

She said: “Politicians have repeatedly shied away from suggesting there should be cuts in that area of spending, as it isn’t a vote winner with older people who are usually more inclined to turn out at elections.”

State pensions equated to around 46 per cent of all welfare spending in 2011/12, figures from the Department of Welfare and Pensions (DWP) showed.

Housing benefit made up 10.55 per cent, disability living allowance made up 7.87 per cent, and incapacity benefit made up 3.06 per cent.

Coun Smith said: “Targeting something like housing benefit is easier politically, but housing benefit is not just paid to households where no one is working, it is paid to many pensioners and households who are earning but on low paid.

“We spend four times as much on state pensions as we do on housing benefit, but if Osborne is determined to squeeze another £25 billion out of government spending while protecting pay-outs to pensioners, then it is housing benefit, jobseekers’ allowance and carers’ allowance that are likely to feel the brunt.”

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:13pm Tue 25 Feb 14

HarryBosch says...

Like everyone else, I understand the need to introduce welfare reforms. But, as this article in some way highlights, the reforms being introduced by this government are being driven by the effects they are likely to have on the electorate and not by the requirements of the people who are in need/at risk. For example: people of pension age account for the most consistent group of people who are most likely to vote. So the government are bending over backwards to try to have the littlest impact on their benefits. Whereas the younger, working age people are the ones being most affected because they are the least likely to turn out to vote.
Like everyone else, I understand the need to introduce welfare reforms. But, as this article in some way highlights, the reforms being introduced by this government are being driven by the effects they are likely to have on the electorate and not by the requirements of the people who are in need/at risk. For example: people of pension age account for the most consistent group of people who are most likely to vote. So the government are bending over backwards to try to have the littlest impact on their benefits. Whereas the younger, working age people are the ones being most affected because they are the least likely to turn out to vote. HarryBosch

1:31pm Tue 25 Feb 14

churchman says...

so true harry.but mark my words,if the tories get in at the next election,first on there agenda will be to hit the pensioners.they will have there benifits cut,no free travel,no heating allowance,and no free tv licence,and credit pensions looked at. be warned this is going to happen.
so true harry.but mark my words,if the tories get in at the next election,first on there agenda will be to hit the pensioners.they will have there benifits cut,no free travel,no heating allowance,and no free tv licence,and credit pensions looked at. be warned this is going to happen. churchman

3:57pm Tue 25 Feb 14

Timefor says...

Hopefully, as time goes by and this government's cuts bite harder, more of us will become increasingly aware that we are having a war waged on us - and we're losing. A major problem is that the only other current viable alternative, the labour party, is also committed to continuing the war, dressed up as "austerity" and so they really do deserve the title of "The Tory B team".

The real problem is that we are governed by people from the rich classes who "know-what's-best-fo
r-us" and this is, that, individually, we must pay for any service we need or want. Fine if you've got the money - not fine if you're just an ordinary person. The only answer is for ordinary folk to get involved, ensure that everyone pays their way and we develop the services we want to see. Yes, this means increasing taxes. Sounds bad? Well, take a look at this link and start to realise that we simply don't pay enough in taxed to fund the services many of us would like to see http://www.bbc.co.uk
/news/magazine-26327
114?utm_source=dlvr.
it&utm_medium=twitte
r
Hopefully, as time goes by and this government's cuts bite harder, more of us will become increasingly aware that we are having a war waged on us - and we're losing. A major problem is that the only other current viable alternative, the labour party, is also committed to continuing the war, dressed up as "austerity" and so they really do deserve the title of "The Tory B team". The real problem is that we are governed by people from the rich classes who "know-what's-best-fo r-us" and this is, that, individually, we must pay for any service we need or want. Fine if you've got the money - not fine if you're just an ordinary person. The only answer is for ordinary folk to get involved, ensure that everyone pays their way and we develop the services we want to see. Yes, this means increasing taxes. Sounds bad? Well, take a look at this link and start to realise that we simply don't pay enough in taxed to fund the services many of us would like to see http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/magazine-26327 114?utm_source=dlvr. it&utm_medium=twitte r Timefor

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree