Heavy rain causes M65 crash

Blackburn Citizen: Heavy rain causes M65 crash Heavy rain causes M65 crash

TWO vehicles collided in heavy rain on the M65 this afternoon.

A Renault Scenic ended up in the central reservation following the incident at 3.10pm, between Junction 7 and Junction 8.

Nobody was injured in the accident and there was congestion for around half an hour while the vehicle was removed from the motorway.

Comments (18)

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5:04pm Fri 31 Jan 14

burner says...

NO !! The weather DIDN'T cause it . . . . . poor judgement / not driving properly to the prevailing conditions MIGHT have contributed to this accident. The truth is we don't know. What with "Rain causing accidents" and "Snow in Blackburn", I reckon the LT is employing a delusionist to write pieces today !
NO !! The weather DIDN'T cause it . . . . . poor judgement / not driving properly to the prevailing conditions MIGHT have contributed to this accident. The truth is we don't know. What with "Rain causing accidents" and "Snow in Blackburn", I reckon the LT is employing a delusionist to write pieces today ! burner
  • Score: 17

5:08pm Fri 31 Jan 14

rudis_dad says...

burner wrote:
NO !! The weather DIDN'T cause it . . . . . poor judgement / not driving properly to the prevailing conditions MIGHT have contributed to this accident. The truth is we don't know. What with "Rain causing accidents" and "Snow in Blackburn", I reckon the LT is employing a delusionist to write pieces today !
Nope, sorry - it's the weather and dangerous roads that cause accidents, not people driving like retards. Have you not been paying attention...???
[quote][p][bold]burner[/bold] wrote: NO !! The weather DIDN'T cause it . . . . . poor judgement / not driving properly to the prevailing conditions MIGHT have contributed to this accident. The truth is we don't know. What with "Rain causing accidents" and "Snow in Blackburn", I reckon the LT is employing a delusionist to write pieces today ![/p][/quote]Nope, sorry - it's the weather and dangerous roads that cause accidents, not people driving like retards. Have you not been paying attention...??? rudis_dad
  • Score: 4

6:04pm Fri 31 Jan 14

burner says...

Ta, rudi, at least I get the heavy irony.
Ta, rudi, at least I get the heavy irony. burner
  • Score: 7

6:07pm Fri 31 Jan 14

HarryBosch says...

I was driving on the M65 & M55 this afternoon between 1pm and 4pm. The rain did cause challenging driving conditions with heavy spray for the most part. I personally didn't think it was safe to drive over 55/60mph and I have to say that a great number of drivers thought the same. However, as usual, there are always the inevitable idiots who think they know better, whizzing past, in some cases, I'm sure, in excess of the 70mph limit.
Some drivers really should not even have a TV licence let alone a driving licence.
One other thing, I had my rear fog lights illuminated because of the seriously reduced visibility and two drivers so fit to flash their own fog lights as they overtook me. Is it any wonder we see almost daily reports of "accidents" in this paper?
I was driving on the M65 & M55 this afternoon between 1pm and 4pm. The rain did cause challenging driving conditions with heavy spray for the most part. I personally didn't think it was safe to drive over 55/60mph and I have to say that a great number of drivers thought the same. However, as usual, there are always the inevitable idiots who think they know better, whizzing past, in some cases, I'm sure, in excess of the 70mph limit. Some drivers really should not even have a TV licence let alone a driving licence. One other thing, I had my rear fog lights illuminated because of the seriously reduced visibility and two drivers so fit to flash their own fog lights as they overtook me. Is it any wonder we see almost daily reports of "accidents" in this paper? HarryBosch
  • Score: 4

6:31pm Fri 31 Jan 14

mmickk says...

HarryBosch wrote:
I was driving on the M65 & M55 this afternoon between 1pm and 4pm. The rain did cause challenging driving conditions with heavy spray for the most part. I personally didn't think it was safe to drive over 55/60mph and I have to say that a great number of drivers thought the same. However, as usual, there are always the inevitable idiots who think they know better, whizzing past, in some cases, I'm sure, in excess of the 70mph limit.
Some drivers really should not even have a TV licence let alone a driving licence.
One other thing, I had my rear fog lights illuminated because of the seriously reduced visibility and two drivers so fit to flash their own fog lights as they overtook me. Is it any wonder we see almost daily reports of "accidents" in this paper?
One of my pet hates is idiots using fog lights. They should only be used in extreme fog. People flashed you because fog lights are blinding its no wonder you did not cause an accident. Yet you call people doing more than 70mph probably to get away from you. Fog lights should only be used when in dense fog time the police fined people like you your a danger on the roads. Just because your eyesight is not good enough to drive others can see well enough without being blinded by fog lights.
[quote][p][bold]HarryBosch[/bold] wrote: I was driving on the M65 & M55 this afternoon between 1pm and 4pm. The rain did cause challenging driving conditions with heavy spray for the most part. I personally didn't think it was safe to drive over 55/60mph and I have to say that a great number of drivers thought the same. However, as usual, there are always the inevitable idiots who think they know better, whizzing past, in some cases, I'm sure, in excess of the 70mph limit. Some drivers really should not even have a TV licence let alone a driving licence. One other thing, I had my rear fog lights illuminated because of the seriously reduced visibility and two drivers so fit to flash their own fog lights as they overtook me. Is it any wonder we see almost daily reports of "accidents" in this paper?[/p][/quote]One of my pet hates is idiots using fog lights. They should only be used in extreme fog. People flashed you because fog lights are blinding its no wonder you did not cause an accident. Yet you call people doing more than 70mph probably to get away from you. Fog lights should only be used when in dense fog time the police fined people like you your a danger on the roads. Just because your eyesight is not good enough to drive others can see well enough without being blinded by fog lights. mmickk
  • Score: 6

7:42pm Fri 31 Jan 14

HarryBosch says...

mmickk wrote:
HarryBosch wrote:
I was driving on the M65 & M55 this afternoon between 1pm and 4pm. The rain did cause challenging driving conditions with heavy spray for the most part. I personally didn't think it was safe to drive over 55/60mph and I have to say that a great number of drivers thought the same. However, as usual, there are always the inevitable idiots who think they know better, whizzing past, in some cases, I'm sure, in excess of the 70mph limit.
Some drivers really should not even have a TV licence let alone a driving licence.
One other thing, I had my rear fog lights illuminated because of the seriously reduced visibility and two drivers so fit to flash their own fog lights as they overtook me. Is it any wonder we see almost daily reports of "accidents" in this paper?
One of my pet hates is idiots using fog lights. They should only be used in extreme fog. People flashed you because fog lights are blinding its no wonder you did not cause an accident. Yet you call people doing more than 70mph probably to get away from you. Fog lights should only be used when in dense fog time the police fined people like you your a danger on the roads. Just because your eyesight is not good enough to drive others can see well enough without being blinded by fog lights.
You need to buy yourself a copy of the Highway Code fella - rule 226 Driving in adverse weather conditions - You MUST use fog lights when visibility is seriously reduced.
It is drivers like you who are part of the problem. Passed your test then forgotten everything you were taught!
The spray from vehicles on the motorway this afternoon was so bad that visibility was less than 100 metres. The last thing I want is some idiot ramming into the back of me because they are travelling too fast to stop in the distance that they can see is clear.
And your post just proves my point - there is no such thing as dangerous roads, just dangerous drivers.
[quote][p][bold]mmickk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HarryBosch[/bold] wrote: I was driving on the M65 & M55 this afternoon between 1pm and 4pm. The rain did cause challenging driving conditions with heavy spray for the most part. I personally didn't think it was safe to drive over 55/60mph and I have to say that a great number of drivers thought the same. However, as usual, there are always the inevitable idiots who think they know better, whizzing past, in some cases, I'm sure, in excess of the 70mph limit. Some drivers really should not even have a TV licence let alone a driving licence. One other thing, I had my rear fog lights illuminated because of the seriously reduced visibility and two drivers so fit to flash their own fog lights as they overtook me. Is it any wonder we see almost daily reports of "accidents" in this paper?[/p][/quote]One of my pet hates is idiots using fog lights. They should only be used in extreme fog. People flashed you because fog lights are blinding its no wonder you did not cause an accident. Yet you call people doing more than 70mph probably to get away from you. Fog lights should only be used when in dense fog time the police fined people like you your a danger on the roads. Just because your eyesight is not good enough to drive others can see well enough without being blinded by fog lights.[/p][/quote]You need to buy yourself a copy of the Highway Code fella - rule 226 Driving in adverse weather conditions - You MUST use fog lights when visibility is seriously reduced. It is drivers like you who are part of the problem. Passed your test then forgotten everything you were taught! The spray from vehicles on the motorway this afternoon was so bad that visibility was less than 100 metres. The last thing I want is some idiot ramming into the back of me because they are travelling too fast to stop in the distance that they can see is clear. And your post just proves my point - there is no such thing as dangerous roads, just dangerous drivers. HarryBosch
  • Score: -5

8:40pm Fri 31 Jan 14

burner says...

Harry, use your fog lights , if you so wish. BUT . . . . bear this in mind - they mask the effectiveness of your brake lights. Lose / lose situation, innit ?
Harry, use your fog lights , if you so wish. BUT . . . . bear this in mind - they mask the effectiveness of your brake lights. Lose / lose situation, innit ? burner
  • Score: 6

8:43pm Fri 31 Jan 14

bishbut says...

again the weather gets the blame not the drivers
again the weather gets the blame not the drivers bishbut
  • Score: 7

8:47pm Fri 31 Jan 14

darwenTower says...

They're called 'fog lights' for a reason Harry.

Not 'raining lights'.

It's not rocket science.

Are you going to leave them on for the next three days?
They're called 'fog lights' for a reason Harry. Not 'raining lights'. It's not rocket science. Are you going to leave them on for the next three days? darwenTower
  • Score: 7

9:38pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Jerzei Balowski says...

HarryBosch wrote:
mmickk wrote:
HarryBosch wrote:
I was driving on the M65 & M55 this afternoon between 1pm and 4pm. The rain did cause challenging driving conditions with heavy spray for the most part. I personally didn't think it was safe to drive over 55/60mph and I have to say that a great number of drivers thought the same. However, as usual, there are always the inevitable idiots who think they know better, whizzing past, in some cases, I'm sure, in excess of the 70mph limit.
Some drivers really should not even have a TV licence let alone a driving licence.
One other thing, I had my rear fog lights illuminated because of the seriously reduced visibility and two drivers so fit to flash their own fog lights as they overtook me. Is it any wonder we see almost daily reports of "accidents" in this paper?
One of my pet hates is idiots using fog lights. They should only be used in extreme fog. People flashed you because fog lights are blinding its no wonder you did not cause an accident. Yet you call people doing more than 70mph probably to get away from you. Fog lights should only be used when in dense fog time the police fined people like you your a danger on the roads. Just because your eyesight is not good enough to drive others can see well enough without being blinded by fog lights.
You need to buy yourself a copy of the Highway Code fella - rule 226 Driving in adverse weather conditions - You MUST use fog lights when visibility is seriously reduced.
It is drivers like you who are part of the problem. Passed your test then forgotten everything you were taught!
The spray from vehicles on the motorway this afternoon was so bad that visibility was less than 100 metres. The last thing I want is some idiot ramming into the back of me because they are travelling too fast to stop in the distance that they can see is clear.
And your post just proves my point - there is no such thing as dangerous roads, just dangerous drivers.
You've read Rule 226 wrong - the MUST refers to headlights, not fog lights.
[quote][p][bold]HarryBosch[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mmickk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HarryBosch[/bold] wrote: I was driving on the M65 & M55 this afternoon between 1pm and 4pm. The rain did cause challenging driving conditions with heavy spray for the most part. I personally didn't think it was safe to drive over 55/60mph and I have to say that a great number of drivers thought the same. However, as usual, there are always the inevitable idiots who think they know better, whizzing past, in some cases, I'm sure, in excess of the 70mph limit. Some drivers really should not even have a TV licence let alone a driving licence. One other thing, I had my rear fog lights illuminated because of the seriously reduced visibility and two drivers so fit to flash their own fog lights as they overtook me. Is it any wonder we see almost daily reports of "accidents" in this paper?[/p][/quote]One of my pet hates is idiots using fog lights. They should only be used in extreme fog. People flashed you because fog lights are blinding its no wonder you did not cause an accident. Yet you call people doing more than 70mph probably to get away from you. Fog lights should only be used when in dense fog time the police fined people like you your a danger on the roads. Just because your eyesight is not good enough to drive others can see well enough without being blinded by fog lights.[/p][/quote]You need to buy yourself a copy of the Highway Code fella - rule 226 Driving in adverse weather conditions - You MUST use fog lights when visibility is seriously reduced. It is drivers like you who are part of the problem. Passed your test then forgotten everything you were taught! The spray from vehicles on the motorway this afternoon was so bad that visibility was less than 100 metres. The last thing I want is some idiot ramming into the back of me because they are travelling too fast to stop in the distance that they can see is clear. And your post just proves my point - there is no such thing as dangerous roads, just dangerous drivers.[/p][/quote]You've read Rule 226 wrong - the MUST refers to headlights, not fog lights. Jerzei Balowski
  • Score: 5

10:01pm Fri 31 Jan 14

mmickk says...

HarryBosch wrote:
mmickk wrote:
HarryBosch wrote:
I was driving on the M65 & M55 this afternoon between 1pm and 4pm. The rain did cause challenging driving conditions with heavy spray for the most part. I personally didn't think it was safe to drive over 55/60mph and I have to say that a great number of drivers thought the same. However, as usual, there are always the inevitable idiots who think they know better, whizzing past, in some cases, I'm sure, in excess of the 70mph limit.
Some drivers really should not even have a TV licence let alone a driving licence.
One other thing, I had my rear fog lights illuminated because of the seriously reduced visibility and two drivers so fit to flash their own fog lights as they overtook me. Is it any wonder we see almost daily reports of "accidents" in this paper?
One of my pet hates is idiots using fog lights. They should only be used in extreme fog. People flashed you because fog lights are blinding its no wonder you did not cause an accident. Yet you call people doing more than 70mph probably to get away from you. Fog lights should only be used when in dense fog time the police fined people like you your a danger on the roads. Just because your eyesight is not good enough to drive others can see well enough without being blinded by fog lights.
You need to buy yourself a copy of the Highway Code fella - rule 226 Driving in adverse weather conditions - You MUST use fog lights when visibility is seriously reduced.
It is drivers like you who are part of the problem. Passed your test then forgotten everything you were taught!
The spray from vehicles on the motorway this afternoon was so bad that visibility was less than 100 metres. The last thing I want is some idiot ramming into the back of me because they are travelling too fast to stop in the distance that they can see is clear.
And your post just proves my point - there is no such thing as dangerous roads, just dangerous drivers.
Just turn your lights on and we will see you and read the highway code Law RVLR regs 25 & 27 You could get fined for using fog lights.
[quote][p][bold]HarryBosch[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mmickk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HarryBosch[/bold] wrote: I was driving on the M65 & M55 this afternoon between 1pm and 4pm. The rain did cause challenging driving conditions with heavy spray for the most part. I personally didn't think it was safe to drive over 55/60mph and I have to say that a great number of drivers thought the same. However, as usual, there are always the inevitable idiots who think they know better, whizzing past, in some cases, I'm sure, in excess of the 70mph limit. Some drivers really should not even have a TV licence let alone a driving licence. One other thing, I had my rear fog lights illuminated because of the seriously reduced visibility and two drivers so fit to flash their own fog lights as they overtook me. Is it any wonder we see almost daily reports of "accidents" in this paper?[/p][/quote]One of my pet hates is idiots using fog lights. They should only be used in extreme fog. People flashed you because fog lights are blinding its no wonder you did not cause an accident. Yet you call people doing more than 70mph probably to get away from you. Fog lights should only be used when in dense fog time the police fined people like you your a danger on the roads. Just because your eyesight is not good enough to drive others can see well enough without being blinded by fog lights.[/p][/quote]You need to buy yourself a copy of the Highway Code fella - rule 226 Driving in adverse weather conditions - You MUST use fog lights when visibility is seriously reduced. It is drivers like you who are part of the problem. Passed your test then forgotten everything you were taught! The spray from vehicles on the motorway this afternoon was so bad that visibility was less than 100 metres. The last thing I want is some idiot ramming into the back of me because they are travelling too fast to stop in the distance that they can see is clear. And your post just proves my point - there is no such thing as dangerous roads, just dangerous drivers.[/p][/quote]Just turn your lights on and we will see you and read the highway code Law RVLR regs 25 & 27 You could get fined for using fog lights. mmickk
  • Score: 4

10:25pm Fri 31 Jan 14

HarryBosch says...

After reading the contradictory posts in relation to fog lights. I have done as suggested and re - read the regulations and HC and I fully stand by my original post. Fog lights may well be so named but they are also to be used when visibility is severely reduced ie: in adverse weather conditions. It is there in black and white Inc in the RVLR which you kindly quoted.
As I said in my original post - with visibility at less than 100 metres and drivers whizzing along at inappropriate speeds, I don't want some idiot running into the back of me because they haven't seen me! Anything I can do to reduce that risk which is within the law, I will do.
After reading the contradictory posts in relation to fog lights. I have done as suggested and re - read the regulations and HC and I fully stand by my original post. Fog lights may well be so named but they are also to be used when visibility is severely reduced ie: in adverse weather conditions. It is there in black and white Inc in the RVLR which you kindly quoted. As I said in my original post - with visibility at less than 100 metres and drivers whizzing along at inappropriate speeds, I don't want some idiot running into the back of me because they haven't seen me! Anything I can do to reduce that risk which is within the law, I will do. HarryBosch
  • Score: -3

11:23pm Fri 31 Jan 14

DOAADIx says...

The official DSA handbook, Driving: The Essential Skills, says:

Driving on Motorways

Wet weather

Visibility can be made worse because at higher speeds vehicles, especially large ones, throw up more spray. So

use your headlights to help other drivers see you. Don’t use rear fog lights unless visibility is less than 100 metres (328 feet)

Harry Bosch is correct. The rest of you aren't.
The official DSA handbook, Driving: The Essential Skills, says: Driving on Motorways Wet weather Visibility can be made worse because at higher speeds vehicles, especially large ones, throw up more spray. So use your headlights to help other drivers see you. Don’t use rear fog lights unless visibility is less than 100 metres (328 feet) Harry Bosch is correct. The rest of you aren't. DOAADIx
  • Score: 3

7:33am Sat 1 Feb 14

Excluded again says...

Heavy rain did not cause the crash. Poor driving caused the crash.
Heavy rain did not cause the crash. Poor driving caused the crash. Excluded again
  • Score: 6

12:45pm Sat 1 Feb 14

darwenTower says...

DOAADIx wrote:
The official DSA handbook, Driving: The Essential Skills, says:

Driving on Motorways

Wet weather

Visibility can be made worse because at higher speeds vehicles, especially large ones, throw up more spray. So

use your headlights to help other drivers see you. Don’t use rear fog lights unless visibility is less than 100 metres (328 feet)

Harry Bosch is correct. The rest of you aren't.
That rather depends on the degree to which visibility was reduced, doesn't it?
[quote][p][bold]DOAADIx[/bold] wrote: The official DSA handbook, Driving: The Essential Skills, says: Driving on Motorways Wet weather Visibility can be made worse because at higher speeds vehicles, especially large ones, throw up more spray. So use your headlights to help other drivers see you. Don’t use rear fog lights unless visibility is less than 100 metres (328 feet) Harry Bosch is correct. The rest of you aren't.[/p][/quote]That rather depends on the degree to which visibility was reduced, doesn't it? darwenTower
  • Score: -1

3:00pm Sat 1 Feb 14

HarryBosch says...

darwenTower wrote:
DOAADIx wrote:
The official DSA handbook, Driving: The Essential Skills, says:

Driving on Motorways

Wet weather

Visibility can be made worse because at higher speeds vehicles, especially large ones, throw up more spray. So

use your headlights to help other drivers see you. Don’t use rear fog lights unless visibility is less than 100 metres (328 feet)

Harry Bosch is correct. The rest of you aren't.
That rather depends on the degree to which visibility was reduced, doesn't it?
As I said a number of times on this story - driving conditions on the motorways in question were challenging with heavy rain and heavy spray, visibility was far less than 100 metres.
A further point - in wet conditions, stopping distances are doubled.
The whole point of my post was that, whilst the majority of drivers were driving at speeds appropriate to the conditions, a great number of others were driving far too fast and it is those inconsiderate people who put the rest of us at risk.
[quote][p][bold]darwenTower[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DOAADIx[/bold] wrote: The official DSA handbook, Driving: The Essential Skills, says: Driving on Motorways Wet weather Visibility can be made worse because at higher speeds vehicles, especially large ones, throw up more spray. So use your headlights to help other drivers see you. Don’t use rear fog lights unless visibility is less than 100 metres (328 feet) Harry Bosch is correct. The rest of you aren't.[/p][/quote]That rather depends on the degree to which visibility was reduced, doesn't it?[/p][/quote]As I said a number of times on this story - driving conditions on the motorways in question were challenging with heavy rain and heavy spray, visibility was far less than 100 metres. A further point - in wet conditions, stopping distances are doubled. The whole point of my post was that, whilst the majority of drivers were driving at speeds appropriate to the conditions, a great number of others were driving far too fast and it is those inconsiderate people who put the rest of us at risk. HarryBosch
  • Score: 1

3:07pm Sat 1 Feb 14

rudis_dad says...

DOAADIx wrote:
The official DSA handbook, Driving: The Essential Skills, says:

Driving on Motorways

Wet weather

Visibility can be made worse because at higher speeds vehicles, especially large ones, throw up more spray. So

use your headlights to help other drivers see you. Don’t use rear fog lights unless visibility is less than 100 metres (328 feet)

Harry Bosch is correct. The rest of you aren't.
This is backed up by the Police driving manual, "Roadcraft" - one hundred metres or less. That said, the visibility in places on the M65 yesterday afternoon was seriously compromised, and I would judge far less than 100m.
[quote][p][bold]DOAADIx[/bold] wrote: The official DSA handbook, Driving: The Essential Skills, says: Driving on Motorways Wet weather Visibility can be made worse because at higher speeds vehicles, especially large ones, throw up more spray. So use your headlights to help other drivers see you. Don’t use rear fog lights unless visibility is less than 100 metres (328 feet) Harry Bosch is correct. The rest of you aren't.[/p][/quote]This is backed up by the Police driving manual, "Roadcraft" - one hundred metres or less. That said, the visibility in places on the M65 yesterday afternoon was seriously compromised, and I would judge far less than 100m. rudis_dad
  • Score: 2

8:40pm Sat 1 Feb 14

DOAADIx says...

Roadcraft also specifically advises the use of fog lights in falling snow if visibility is seriously reduced. So not quite the "fog only" scenario some of the earlier posters were suggesting.

This is part of the problem. All too many people consider themselves to be good drivers, when in truth they are far less able than they believe.

I discovered one of my ex-pupils was regularly driving at 100mph+ on motorways. When challenged by her mother and brother, she replied "I can handle a car - I know what I'm doing". She's had a licence all of three years, and now she's an expert.
Roadcraft also specifically advises the use of fog lights in falling snow if visibility is seriously reduced. So not quite the "fog only" scenario some of the earlier posters were suggesting. This is part of the problem. All too many people consider themselves to be good drivers, when in truth they are far less able than they believe. I discovered one of my ex-pupils was regularly driving at 100mph+ on motorways. When challenged by her mother and brother, she replied "I can handle a car - I know what I'm doing". She's had a licence all of three years, and now she's an expert. DOAADIx
  • Score: 3

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