Blackburn war memorial call from relative

Blackburn Citizen: George Hardman is calling for names to be recognised on the Corporation Park memorial George Hardman is calling for names to be recognised on the Corporation Park memorial

A RELATIVE of a solider who died during the First World War has called for a new plaque listing the names of all the local soliders killed in both world wars to be erected in Corporation Park, Blackburn.

George Hardman’s uncle, Private Daniel Ashton died aged 18 in May 1915, and was the son of John James and Catherine Ashton who lived in Whalley Old Road, Blackburn.

Mr Hardman, 79, who lives in Whalley, has called on Blackburn with Darwen Council to put up a new plaque after noticing that names on the cathedral grounds memorial, which includes his uncle’s name, were fading and becoming ‘almost impossible to read’.

The Royal British Legion in Blackburn have given their support to Mr Hardman and want a new memorial to be put up in the Remembrance Garden in the park.

Mr Hardman said: “It’s a disgrace that the council have not spotted this problem sooner and I very much hope that something can be done about it.

“It’s the centenary of the start of the First World War next year and it’s only right that the council put up a new memorial which includes all of the names of the fallen in the area during the war.

“The memorial in the cathedral grounds is becoming harder to read each year because of the weather damage and soon no one will be able to pick out their relative’s names.”

Des Owen, president of the Royal British Legion in Blackburn, said: “I fully support this idea and it would be fitting if a new plaque were to be erected in the centenary year.

“It’s important to make sure that these memorials are well kept.”

A spokeswoman for the council said it was waiting to hear from the British Legion and Mr Hardman and it would hold talks with them on the topic.

Comments (5)

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1:59pm Fri 6 Dec 13

grumpyoldlady says...

Good idea. Perhaps an appeal could be launched and subscriptions could help to meet the cost. I had two relatives both killed in the first world war and would be pleased to make a donation. I would be proud to see their names displayed in their home town.
Good idea. Perhaps an appeal could be launched and subscriptions could help to meet the cost. I had two relatives both killed in the first world war and would be pleased to make a donation. I would be proud to see their names displayed in their home town. grumpyoldlady

8:05pm Fri 6 Dec 13

woolywords says...

“Old soldiers never die,
Never die, never die,
Old soldiers never die —
They simply fade away."
Words from a WW1 parody of a song, yet it seems somewhat fitting that the names do fade on the memorials, as we remember both those those whom died and those, the forgotten ones, horribly mutilated and maimed but survived.
Will this list include those who lost their lives as stretcher bearers, (the conscientious objectors, Quakers and the like) or do we leave them off, as so often happens? Many don't know that they were sent to the front and not to prison? What about those whom were shot for cowardice, when they were clearly mentally ill, do we forget about them?
What does, naming names do, other than to rekindle old wounds? Far better that people contribute to the care of the survivors, who gave an arm, a leg, an eye or even, in some cases, their minds.
And know this, all of the fallen are remembered, not by name but through the tomb of that unknown soldier, who is known only to God.
I couldn't help thinking, in the park, on Remembrance Sunday, that simple plaque speaks volumes, for it makes you think of all of the dead, on both sides. Are their lives of less value because they fought against us? Are we such a vainglorious nation, that we only remember our dead and lack the compassion and forgiveness, not honour their ultimate sacrifice in that same war?
As I said earlier, all of them are known unto God, is that not enough?
“Old soldiers never die, Never die, never die, Old soldiers never die — They simply fade away." Words from a WW1 parody of a song, yet it seems somewhat fitting that the names do fade on the memorials, as we remember both those those whom died and those, the forgotten ones, horribly mutilated and maimed but survived. Will this list include those who lost their lives as stretcher bearers, (the conscientious objectors, Quakers and the like) or do we leave them off, as so often happens? Many don't know that they were sent to the front and not to prison? What about those whom were shot for cowardice, when they were clearly mentally ill, do we forget about them? What does, naming names do, other than to rekindle old wounds? Far better that people contribute to the care of the survivors, who gave an arm, a leg, an eye or even, in some cases, their minds. And know this, all of the fallen are remembered, not by name but through the tomb of that unknown soldier, who is known only to God. I couldn't help thinking, in the park, on Remembrance Sunday, that simple plaque speaks volumes, for it makes you think of all of the dead, on both sides. Are their lives of less value because they fought against us? Are we such a vainglorious nation, that we only remember our dead and lack the compassion and forgiveness, not honour their ultimate sacrifice in that same war? As I said earlier, all of them are known unto God, is that not enough? woolywords

9:00pm Fri 6 Dec 13

Reasons says...

It is a great idea but how about the graves in Blackburn Old cemetery of the soldiers that fell in both wars. Those in family plots overgrown and forgotten ,It is the hard work of the volunteers of that group who are helping to restore them also planting poppy seeds and hoping to place poppy on each of the graves of those killed in action or through action .Little Harwood clock has names on of those fallen.it would be good to restore the resting places of these young men like the friends are doing in the cemetery
It is a great idea but how about the graves in Blackburn Old cemetery of the soldiers that fell in both wars. Those in family plots overgrown and forgotten ,It is the hard work of the volunteers of that group who are helping to restore them also planting poppy seeds and hoping to place poppy on each of the graves of those killed in action or through action .Little Harwood clock has names on of those fallen.it would be good to restore the resting places of these young men like the friends are doing in the cemetery Reasons

4:18am Sun 8 Dec 13

eric4kath says...

Read with interest as I had an uncle killed in the 1ST World War , September1918 aged 21 years he was in the Machine Gun Corp his rank and name was CPL Albert Wolstenholme MM did not know of this plaque as I have never known about it , as I now live in Australia I wonder if someone would be so kind to either verify he is on or send me a photo of the plaque , he lived in Withers Street , now mostly demolished ,my email is ewolst@gmail.com , thank you Eric Wolstenholme
Read with interest as I had an uncle killed in the 1ST World War , September1918 aged 21 years he was in the Machine Gun Corp his rank and name was CPL Albert Wolstenholme MM did not know of this plaque as I have never known about it , as I now live in Australia I wonder if someone would be so kind to either verify he is on or send me a photo of the plaque , he lived in Withers Street , now mostly demolished ,my email is ewolst@gmail.com , thank you Eric Wolstenholme eric4kath

6:05pm Tue 10 Dec 13

superyob says...

Won't happen. It will offend the Ethnic Majority ................
Won't happen. It will offend the Ethnic Majority ................ superyob

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