Pensioner robbed while having an operation at Royal Blackburn Hospital

Blackburn Citizen: HEARTBROKEN Marlene McGuirk-Ruane HEARTBROKEN Marlene McGuirk-Ruane

A THIEF stole a pensioner’s wedding and engagement rings as she had surgery at Royal Blackburn Hospital.

Heartbroken Marlene McGuirk-Ruane had gone to the hospital for a keyhole operation to check if she had cancer.

But she was devastated when she found her two wedding rings, two engagement rings and a pair of gold necklaces had been taken from her bag as she lay on the operating table.

A leading patient campaigner described the theft as ‘despicable’ and warned patients to be vigilant.

Police said the incident was one of nine thefts from the hospital reported to them since October 1.

Other items stolen included items from a handbag, a mobile phone, a bike and clothes taken from a staff area.

Mrs McGuirk-Ruane, 77, said she had received one of the wedding rings from her late husband, Jim, 60 years ago.

She said: “I only realised when I got to the hospital that I had forgotten to take my jewellery off.

“When they asked me to change I put everything inside a case I had taken with me.

“We thought I would be in overnight so my husband, Michael, went home and the nurse said I could leave my case at the hospital and it would be safe.

“As I was leaving they got my case and I went home in a taxi.”

Mrs McGuirk-Ruane and her husband, who she married in 2009, had arrived at the hospital at 9.30am for a 10am appointment.

While she was having her blood pressure taken in a small room she was asked to step behind a curtain to get changed.

At that point she put her clothes and jewellery into the case.

She was then taken to another room and she said she did not see her case again until 4.30pm after being told she could go home because her lump was not cancerous.

Mrs McGuirk-Ruane, from Blackpool, said she was so consumed with relief she did not notice the missing jewellery.

She said: “I had been waiting for a month for the surgery so I had been quite upset.

“I had told Michael to take the case home but the nurse said it would be safe so he left it and went home.

“When I checked the case the next day at home I found out it had all gone. I was in shock.

“Nobody should have to go through this. I can’t buy those rings again, they meant so much to me.

“The people who have them should burn in hell.”

Russ McClean, from the Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS), said he was horrified to learn of the theft.

He said: “What sort of despicable person would steal from somebody who is in hospital having treatment or an operation?

“I would ask all patients to be extra vigilant and if they see anything suspicious to report it to a member of staff.

“I would also advise people not to take valuables with them if they are going to hospital.”

A spokeswoman for East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust said: “The trust has been made aware of this incident.

“The trust is undertaking a full investigation into the allegation and a PALS officer is in the process of contacting Mrs McGuirk directly following her contact with them.”

Comments (15)

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11:47am Wed 5 Dec 12

juanbbien says...

The lady came over from Blackpool to Blackburn for a potential Cancer diagnosis she would be worried to death about the outcome and some low life steals her rings,I hope she gets them back and I apologise on behalf of the decent people of Blackburn
The lady came over from Blackpool to Blackburn for a potential Cancer diagnosis she would be worried to death about the outcome and some low life steals her rings,I hope she gets them back and I apologise on behalf of the decent people of Blackburn juanbbien
  • Score: 0

12:07pm Wed 5 Dec 12

AndyW says...

Robbery can only occur when there's violence or the realistic threat of violence when taking somebody else's property (with the intent to keep it), so technically this is theft.

Not to take away from the incident though, absolute low lifes who did this.
Robbery can only occur when there's violence or the realistic threat of violence when taking somebody else's property (with the intent to keep it), so technically this is theft. Not to take away from the incident though, absolute low lifes who did this. AndyW
  • Score: 0

1:26pm Wed 5 Dec 12

A Darener says...

Sorry for the lady's loss. It is a dispicable act to thieve from a hospital, or anywhere else for that matter.
Just a suggestion to the health trust, why don't they get in touch with hotel chains or the makers of hotel room safes. Maybe they would sponsor a few safes to be fitted in appropriate places in the hospitals to safeguard patients valuables? This could be good publicity for the hotels.
Sorry for the lady's loss. It is a dispicable act to thieve from a hospital, or anywhere else for that matter. Just a suggestion to the health trust, why don't they get in touch with hotel chains or the makers of hotel room safes. Maybe they would sponsor a few safes to be fitted in appropriate places in the hospitals to safeguard patients valuables? This could be good publicity for the hotels. A Darener
  • Score: 0

1:36pm Wed 5 Dec 12

slimitus says...

Nice to see the good folk at Blackburn, taking care of your belongings while you're in for a really stressful series of tests, to be found that she was robbed by some disgusting despicable individual / individuals. So much for safety in that hospital. I will never trust those cowboys with anything ever again after this. Truly disgusting.
Nice to see the good folk at Blackburn, taking care of your belongings while you're in for a really stressful series of tests, to be found that she was robbed by some disgusting despicable individual / individuals. So much for safety in that hospital. I will never trust those cowboys with anything ever again after this. Truly disgusting. slimitus
  • Score: 0

2:03pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Fire Fly says...

slimitus wrote:
Nice to see the good folk at Blackburn, taking care of your belongings while you're in for a really stressful series of tests, to be found that she was robbed by some disgusting despicable individual / individuals. So much for safety in that hospital. I will never trust those cowboys with anything ever again after this. Truly disgusting.
What an utterly ridiculous statement! How can you condemn an entire town for the act of probably one person...who is unidentified at this stage & therefore his/her home town is also unknown. The hospital may be in Blackburn but not all staff & visitors are from the town you buffoon.

One sick individual caused this...save your condemnation for them because they are the one wandering round a hospital preying on patients.
[quote][p][bold]slimitus[/bold] wrote: Nice to see the good folk at Blackburn, taking care of your belongings while you're in for a really stressful series of tests, to be found that she was robbed by some disgusting despicable individual / individuals. So much for safety in that hospital. I will never trust those cowboys with anything ever again after this. Truly disgusting.[/p][/quote]What an utterly ridiculous statement! How can you condemn an entire town for the act of probably one person...who is unidentified at this stage & therefore his/her home town is also unknown. The hospital may be in Blackburn but not all staff & visitors are from the town you buffoon. One sick individual caused this...save your condemnation for them because they are the one wandering round a hospital preying on patients. Fire Fly
  • Score: 0

4:37pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Linzi.cooban says...

Fire Fly wrote:
slimitus wrote:
Nice to see the good folk at Blackburn, taking care of your belongings while you're in for a really stressful series of tests, to be found that she was robbed by some disgusting despicable individual / individuals. So much for safety in that hospital. I will never trust those cowboys with anything ever again after this. Truly disgusting.
What an utterly ridiculous statement! How can you condemn an entire town for the act of probably one person...who is unidentified at this stage & therefore his/her home town is also unknown. The hospital may be in Blackburn but not all staff & visitors are from the town you buffoon.

One sick individual caused this...save your condemnation for them because they are the one wandering round a hospital preying on patients.
could be a nurse doctor porter anytype of employer.as you see from thia paste
(Police said the incident was one of nine thefts from the hospital reported to them since October 1)
some1 who freaquents the hospital quite alot or as i said may possibly work there
[quote][p][bold]Fire Fly[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]slimitus[/bold] wrote: Nice to see the good folk at Blackburn, taking care of your belongings while you're in for a really stressful series of tests, to be found that she was robbed by some disgusting despicable individual / individuals. So much for safety in that hospital. I will never trust those cowboys with anything ever again after this. Truly disgusting.[/p][/quote]What an utterly ridiculous statement! How can you condemn an entire town for the act of probably one person...who is unidentified at this stage & therefore his/her home town is also unknown. The hospital may be in Blackburn but not all staff & visitors are from the town you buffoon. One sick individual caused this...save your condemnation for them because they are the one wandering round a hospital preying on patients.[/p][/quote]could be a nurse doctor porter anytype of employer.as you see from thia paste (Police said the incident was one of nine thefts from the hospital reported to them since October 1) some1 who freaquents the hospital quite alot or as i said may possibly work there Linzi.cooban
  • Score: 0

4:50pm Wed 5 Dec 12

ladysal says...

When I worked in the NHS, all valuables taken from patients in that stuation had to be logged by two members of staff, including full description of the article, and the item was then locked away in the controlled drugs cabinet. At least if they then went missing, you could pin it down to the senior nurse on the ward who was the only one to hold the relevant keys. The ideal, which was stressed at every opportunity, was that relatives should take any valuables home.
Maybe RBH should return to that system? It would after all not involve any cost.
When I worked in the NHS, all valuables taken from patients in that stuation had to be logged by two members of staff, including full description of the article, and the item was then locked away in the controlled drugs cabinet. At least if they then went missing, you could pin it down to the senior nurse on the ward who was the only one to hold the relevant keys. The ideal, which was stressed at every opportunity, was that relatives should take any valuables home. Maybe RBH should return to that system? It would after all not involve any cost. ladysal
  • Score: 0

5:34pm Wed 5 Dec 12

A Darener says...

ladysal wrote:
When I worked in the NHS, all valuables taken from patients in that stuation had to be logged by two members of staff, including full description of the article, and the item was then locked away in the controlled drugs cabinet. At least if they then went missing, you could pin it down to the senior nurse on the ward who was the only one to hold the relevant keys. The ideal, which was stressed at every opportunity, was that relatives should take any valuables home.
Maybe RBH should return to that system? It would after all not involve any cost.
Whilst this system may work, it is not without cost. Anything that takes a nurse away from patient care has a cost, both in time and money. It is not the responsibility of the health service to act as guardian for patients valuables. My earlier suggestion would relieve the HS of responsibility and cost them nothing.
[quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: When I worked in the NHS, all valuables taken from patients in that stuation had to be logged by two members of staff, including full description of the article, and the item was then locked away in the controlled drugs cabinet. At least if they then went missing, you could pin it down to the senior nurse on the ward who was the only one to hold the relevant keys. The ideal, which was stressed at every opportunity, was that relatives should take any valuables home. Maybe RBH should return to that system? It would after all not involve any cost.[/p][/quote]Whilst this system may work, it is not without cost. Anything that takes a nurse away from patient care has a cost, both in time and money. It is not the responsibility of the health service to act as guardian for patients valuables. My earlier suggestion would relieve the HS of responsibility and cost them nothing. A Darener
  • Score: 0

6:26pm Wed 5 Dec 12

phil kernot says...

ANY ONE CAN GET A JOB WITH A CRIMINAL RECORD EVEN WHEN THAT DO A CRB CHECK , YOU JUST CHANGE YOUR , DATE OF BIRTH BY 1 DIGIT , SAY IF IT WAS , 20 10 2012 YOU COULD CHANGE IT TO
21 12 2012 , CRB DOES NOT MATCH DOB TO NATIONAL INSURANCE , THATS A FACT , AND PEOPLE FROM THE EU CAN NOT BE CHECKED EITHER , CAUSE AS SOON AS THAY LAND HERE THERE GIVEN A BRAND NEW I.N NUMBER SO IT WORTHLESS PAPER WORK AT THE EXPENCE OF THE BRITISH EMPLOYEE , ( I KNOW THIS IS FACT AS I RUNG AND PUT THIS POINT TO THEM AND THAY SAID ITS TRUE , :(
ANY ONE CAN GET A JOB WITH A CRIMINAL RECORD EVEN WHEN THAT DO A CRB CHECK , YOU JUST CHANGE YOUR , DATE OF BIRTH BY 1 DIGIT , SAY IF IT WAS , 20 10 2012 YOU COULD CHANGE IT TO 21 12 2012 , CRB DOES NOT MATCH DOB TO NATIONAL INSURANCE , THATS A FACT , AND PEOPLE FROM THE EU CAN NOT BE CHECKED EITHER , CAUSE AS SOON AS THAY LAND HERE THERE GIVEN A BRAND NEW I.N NUMBER SO IT WORTHLESS PAPER WORK AT THE EXPENCE OF THE BRITISH EMPLOYEE , ( I KNOW THIS IS FACT AS I RUNG AND PUT THIS POINT TO THEM AND THAY SAID ITS TRUE , :( phil kernot
  • Score: 0

9:33pm Wed 5 Dec 12

julespent says...

There are lots of people wandering around the hospital, patients, staff and visitors. I doubt it is staff, it will be some low life opportunist who wanders in around and out of the hospital to strike at any given moment. I know a health centre worker who got her handbag stolen, purse, phone, her car keys and stole her car from the health centre car park. Needless to say the thief was back into the health centre a week or 2 later and stole a petty cash tin. The thief was a patient at the health centre and was still allowed in!!!
There are lots of people wandering around the hospital, patients, staff and visitors. I doubt it is staff, it will be some low life opportunist who wanders in around and out of the hospital to strike at any given moment. I know a health centre worker who got her handbag stolen, purse, phone, her car keys and stole her car from the health centre car park. Needless to say the thief was back into the health centre a week or 2 later and stole a petty cash tin. The thief was a patient at the health centre and was still allowed in!!! julespent
  • Score: 0

11:25pm Wed 5 Dec 12

Fire Fly says...

Linzi.cooban wrote:
Fire Fly wrote:
slimitus wrote:
Nice to see the good folk at Blackburn, taking care of your belongings while you're in for a really stressful series of tests, to be found that she was robbed by some disgusting despicable individual / individuals. So much for safety in that hospital. I will never trust those cowboys with anything ever again after this. Truly disgusting.
What an utterly ridiculous statement! How can you condemn an entire town for the act of probably one person...who is unidentified at this stage & therefore his/her home town is also unknown. The hospital may be in Blackburn but not all staff & visitors are from the town you buffoon.

One sick individual caused this...save your condemnation for them because they are the one wandering round a hospital preying on patients.
could be a nurse doctor porter anytype of employer.as you see from thia paste
(Police said the incident was one of nine thefts from the hospital reported to them since October 1)
some1 who freaquents the hospital quite alot or as i said may possibly work there
Regardless...it still doesn't indicate a person of Blackburn committing this crime!! Clearly someone who frequents the ward legitimately...n by that I mean, family or other etc ,.. would have involvement
[quote][p][bold]Linzi.cooban[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fire Fly[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]slimitus[/bold] wrote: Nice to see the good folk at Blackburn, taking care of your belongings while you're in for a really stressful series of tests, to be found that she was robbed by some disgusting despicable individual / individuals. So much for safety in that hospital. I will never trust those cowboys with anything ever again after this. Truly disgusting.[/p][/quote]What an utterly ridiculous statement! How can you condemn an entire town for the act of probably one person...who is unidentified at this stage & therefore his/her home town is also unknown. The hospital may be in Blackburn but not all staff & visitors are from the town you buffoon. One sick individual caused this...save your condemnation for them because they are the one wandering round a hospital preying on patients.[/p][/quote]could be a nurse doctor porter anytype of employer.as you see from thia paste (Police said the incident was one of nine thefts from the hospital reported to them since October 1) some1 who freaquents the hospital quite alot or as i said may possibly work there[/p][/quote]Regardless...it still doesn't indicate a person of Blackburn committing this crime!! Clearly someone who frequents the ward legitimately...n by that I mean, family or other etc ,.. would have involvement Fire Fly
  • Score: 0

8:25am Thu 6 Dec 12

ladysal says...

A Darener wrote:
ladysal wrote: When I worked in the NHS, all valuables taken from patients in that stuation had to be logged by two members of staff, including full description of the article, and the item was then locked away in the controlled drugs cabinet. At least if they then went missing, you could pin it down to the senior nurse on the ward who was the only one to hold the relevant keys. The ideal, which was stressed at every opportunity, was that relatives should take any valuables home. Maybe RBH should return to that system? It would after all not involve any cost.
Whilst this system may work, it is not without cost. Anything that takes a nurse away from patient care has a cost, both in time and money. It is not the responsibility of the health service to act as guardian for patients valuables. My earlier suggestion would relieve the HS of responsibility and cost them nothing.
Your earlier suggestion gives the impression that there would be a few safes dotted around..... Well, someone would have to hold the combination / sign the stuff into the safe and who do you think would do that? Nursing staff at a guess. Someone would have to pay for the safes and I seriously doubt that the companies who make them would give them away for free. CD cabinets are already in place on all acute wards. Surely, part of the remit of nurses is to ensure the patients peace of mind? Taking two minutes to put special items into a cabinet would surely help with that.
[quote][p][bold]A Darener[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: When I worked in the NHS, all valuables taken from patients in that stuation had to be logged by two members of staff, including full description of the article, and the item was then locked away in the controlled drugs cabinet. At least if they then went missing, you could pin it down to the senior nurse on the ward who was the only one to hold the relevant keys. The ideal, which was stressed at every opportunity, was that relatives should take any valuables home. Maybe RBH should return to that system? It would after all not involve any cost.[/p][/quote]Whilst this system may work, it is not without cost. Anything that takes a nurse away from patient care has a cost, both in time and money. It is not the responsibility of the health service to act as guardian for patients valuables. My earlier suggestion would relieve the HS of responsibility and cost them nothing.[/p][/quote]Your earlier suggestion gives the impression that there would be a few safes dotted around..... Well, someone would have to hold the combination / sign the stuff into the safe and who do you think would do that? Nursing staff at a guess. Someone would have to pay for the safes and I seriously doubt that the companies who make them would give them away for free. CD cabinets are already in place on all acute wards. Surely, part of the remit of nurses is to ensure the patients peace of mind? Taking two minutes to put special items into a cabinet would surely help with that. ladysal
  • Score: 0

8:34am Thu 6 Dec 12

A Darener says...

ladysal wrote:
A Darener wrote:
ladysal wrote: When I worked in the NHS, all valuables taken from patients in that stuation had to be logged by two members of staff, including full description of the article, and the item was then locked away in the controlled drugs cabinet. At least if they then went missing, you could pin it down to the senior nurse on the ward who was the only one to hold the relevant keys. The ideal, which was stressed at every opportunity, was that relatives should take any valuables home. Maybe RBH should return to that system? It would after all not involve any cost.
Whilst this system may work, it is not without cost. Anything that takes a nurse away from patient care has a cost, both in time and money. It is not the responsibility of the health service to act as guardian for patients valuables. My earlier suggestion would relieve the HS of responsibility and cost them nothing.
Your earlier suggestion gives the impression that there would be a few safes dotted around..... Well, someone would have to hold the combination / sign the stuff into the safe and who do you think would do that? Nursing staff at a guess. Someone would have to pay for the safes and I seriously doubt that the companies who make them would give them away for free. CD cabinets are already in place on all acute wards. Surely, part of the remit of nurses is to ensure the patients peace of mind? Taking two minutes to put special items into a cabinet would surely help with that.
You completely ignored what I actually wrote. I said hotel type safes. These use a code Inputted by the user, no combination required. So can be used by a patient, no need for staff input. Many firms sponsor products free of charge to the owners. So any firm could supply the safes as an advertising campaign, again at no expense to the health service.
Nursing staff have too much admin to do as it is without unnecessary extra work. Leave the medical staff to do medical work.
[quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]A Darener[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: When I worked in the NHS, all valuables taken from patients in that stuation had to be logged by two members of staff, including full description of the article, and the item was then locked away in the controlled drugs cabinet. At least if they then went missing, you could pin it down to the senior nurse on the ward who was the only one to hold the relevant keys. The ideal, which was stressed at every opportunity, was that relatives should take any valuables home. Maybe RBH should return to that system? It would after all not involve any cost.[/p][/quote]Whilst this system may work, it is not without cost. Anything that takes a nurse away from patient care has a cost, both in time and money. It is not the responsibility of the health service to act as guardian for patients valuables. My earlier suggestion would relieve the HS of responsibility and cost them nothing.[/p][/quote]Your earlier suggestion gives the impression that there would be a few safes dotted around..... Well, someone would have to hold the combination / sign the stuff into the safe and who do you think would do that? Nursing staff at a guess. Someone would have to pay for the safes and I seriously doubt that the companies who make them would give them away for free. CD cabinets are already in place on all acute wards. Surely, part of the remit of nurses is to ensure the patients peace of mind? Taking two minutes to put special items into a cabinet would surely help with that.[/p][/quote]You completely ignored what I actually wrote. I said hotel type safes. These use a code Inputted by the user, no combination required. So can be used by a patient, no need for staff input. Many firms sponsor products free of charge to the owners. So any firm could supply the safes as an advertising campaign, again at no expense to the health service. Nursing staff have too much admin to do as it is without unnecessary extra work. Leave the medical staff to do medical work. A Darener
  • Score: 0

10:44am Thu 6 Dec 12

roversjeff says...

Two words to describe the thief. UTTER SCUM
Two words to describe the thief. UTTER SCUM roversjeff
  • Score: 0

3:42pm Thu 6 Dec 12

ladysal says...

A Darener wrote:
ladysal wrote:
A Darener wrote:
ladysal wrote: When I worked in the NHS, all valuables taken from patients in that stuation had to be logged by two members of staff, including full description of the article, and the item was then locked away in the controlled drugs cabinet. At least if they then went missing, you could pin it down to the senior nurse on the ward who was the only one to hold the relevant keys. The ideal, which was stressed at every opportunity, was that relatives should take any valuables home. Maybe RBH should return to that system? It would after all not involve any cost.
Whilst this system may work, it is not without cost. Anything that takes a nurse away from patient care has a cost, both in time and money. It is not the responsibility of the health service to act as guardian for patients valuables. My earlier suggestion would relieve the HS of responsibility and cost them nothing.
Your earlier suggestion gives the impression that there would be a few safes dotted around..... Well, someone would have to hold the combination / sign the stuff into the safe and who do you think would do that? Nursing staff at a guess. Someone would have to pay for the safes and I seriously doubt that the companies who make them would give them away for free. CD cabinets are already in place on all acute wards. Surely, part of the remit of nurses is to ensure the patients peace of mind? Taking two minutes to put special items into a cabinet would surely help with that.
You completely ignored what I actually wrote. I said hotel type safes. These use a code Inputted by the user, no combination required. So can be used by a patient, no need for staff input. Many firms sponsor products free of charge to the owners. So any firm could supply the safes as an advertising campaign, again at no expense to the health service. Nursing staff have too much admin to do as it is without unnecessary extra work. Leave the medical staff to do medical work.
No I didn't:
"Maybe they would sponsor a few safes to be fitted in appropriate places in the hospitals to safeguard patients valuables? This could be good publicity for the hotels."
How many is a few? Would there be one for each bed? You really think they will sponsr that many for every hospital?
A nurse already has to go through an exhaustive list with the patient before they go to theatre. What is 10 seconds more added to that? Anything added to / taken from the CDT cabinet requires two nurses: again, what is ten seconds added to that?
Yes, nursing staff have too much admin work to do, but this hardly compares, especially if it adds to the patient's peace of mind.
[quote][p][bold]A Darener[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]A Darener[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ladysal[/bold] wrote: When I worked in the NHS, all valuables taken from patients in that stuation had to be logged by two members of staff, including full description of the article, and the item was then locked away in the controlled drugs cabinet. At least if they then went missing, you could pin it down to the senior nurse on the ward who was the only one to hold the relevant keys. The ideal, which was stressed at every opportunity, was that relatives should take any valuables home. Maybe RBH should return to that system? It would after all not involve any cost.[/p][/quote]Whilst this system may work, it is not without cost. Anything that takes a nurse away from patient care has a cost, both in time and money. It is not the responsibility of the health service to act as guardian for patients valuables. My earlier suggestion would relieve the HS of responsibility and cost them nothing.[/p][/quote]Your earlier suggestion gives the impression that there would be a few safes dotted around..... Well, someone would have to hold the combination / sign the stuff into the safe and who do you think would do that? Nursing staff at a guess. Someone would have to pay for the safes and I seriously doubt that the companies who make them would give them away for free. CD cabinets are already in place on all acute wards. Surely, part of the remit of nurses is to ensure the patients peace of mind? Taking two minutes to put special items into a cabinet would surely help with that.[/p][/quote]You completely ignored what I actually wrote. I said hotel type safes. These use a code Inputted by the user, no combination required. So can be used by a patient, no need for staff input. Many firms sponsor products free of charge to the owners. So any firm could supply the safes as an advertising campaign, again at no expense to the health service. Nursing staff have too much admin to do as it is without unnecessary extra work. Leave the medical staff to do medical work.[/p][/quote]No I didn't: "Maybe they would sponsor a few safes to be fitted in appropriate places in the hospitals to safeguard patients valuables? This could be good publicity for the hotels." How many is a few? Would there be one for each bed? You really think they will sponsr that many for every hospital? A nurse already has to go through an exhaustive list with the patient before they go to theatre. What is 10 seconds more added to that? Anything added to / taken from the CDT cabinet requires two nurses: again, what is ten seconds added to that? Yes, nursing staff have too much admin work to do, but this hardly compares, especially if it adds to the patient's peace of mind. ladysal
  • Score: 0

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